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Rhode Island Resource Recovery Corporation Compost Receives Approval for Use in Organic Farming

Rhode Islanders no longer need to make a trip to their local home improvement store for high-quality compost – they can literally find it in their own backyards.

Study Shows UN Hits Water Target, but 1.8 Billion People still Drinking Unsafe Water

Recent widespread news coverage heralded the success of a United Nations' goal of greatly improving access to safe drinking water around the world.

Ecologist Simulates Climate Change with Infrared Heaters

Climate change is leading to higher temperatures around the world, forcing plants, trees and animals to adapt to new conditions or relocate, often to higher elevations. But the process is gradual, and the effects of climate warming can usually only be observed over the course of years and decades.

Idaho Hazardous Waste Disposal Site Failed to Disclose Chemical Releases

US Ecology Idaho, Inc., a hazardous waste disposal site in Grand View, Idaho, failed to report the on-site disposal of thousands of pounds of chemicals at its facility, according to a settlement with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The company has corrected the violations of the Toxics Release Inventory Program and will pay a fine.

Development Agreement for Seawater Desalination Project in Dahej, Gujarat, India

A consortium comprising Hitachi, Ltd., ITOCHU Corporation and Hyflux Ltd. (collectively known as the "Consortium") signed a Co-Developer Agreement ("CDA") with Dahej SEZ Ltd. ("DSL"), the management company of Dahej Special Economic Zone ("Dahej SEZ") in Gujarat, located in Western India, in relation to the implementation of a seawater desalination project (the "Project") in Dahej SEZ.

A Warming Antarctic Brings Changes to Penguin Breeding Cycles

Three penguin species that share the Western Antarctic Peninsula for breeding grounds have been affected in different ways by the higher temperatures brought on by global warming, according to Stony Brook University Ecology and Evolution Assistant Professor Heather Lynch and colleagues. The work by Lynch and her team is contained in three papers that have been published online in Polar Biology, Ecology and Marine Ecology Progress Series (MEPS).

On NYC Streets, Big Test for Competing Pothole Machines

The Python pothole-filling machine is operated by one person from inside the vehicle’s cab, which maximizes safety and efficiency, according to Mayor Bloomberg’s office. A Rosco machine also is being tested.



Conservation Helps Secure Land Rights in Cambodia

A vulnerable ethic minority village inside Cambodia’s remote Seima Protection Forest recenlty became one of the first in Cambodia to receive a collective land title, which will help villagers fend off threats to their land and culture while also strengthening conservation goals.

BLS Counts Green Goods and Services Jobs

There were 3.1 million of them in the United States in 2010, which represents 2.4 percent of total employment that year. But such jobs accounted for 6.8 percent of all construction jobs.

Oil from Deepwater Horizon Disaster Entered Food Chain in the Gulf of Mexico

A new study confirms that oil from the Macondo well made it into the ocean's food chain through the tiniest of organisms, zooplankton.

Another Vertebrate Species Reported Extinct from the Hawaiian Islands

A species of lizard is now extinct from the Hawaiian Islands, making it the latest native vertebrate species to become extirpated from this tropical archipelago.

Possible Solution to Overfishing

A study by the Wildlife Conservation Society, ARC Centre for Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, and other groups on more than 40 coral reefs in the Indian and Pacific Oceans indicates that "co-management" -- a collaborative arrangement between local communities, conservation groups, and governments -- provides a solution to a vexing global problem: overfishing.

Former Exxon Valdez Being Scrapped

GMS, the world’s largest cash buyer of ships for recycling, reportedly will scrap the ship now named the Oriental Nicety in India.

Green Jail to Demonstrate Power of Microgrids

If all goes according to plan, this “mega-jail,” housing about 4,000 inmates, will seamlessly disconnect itself from the electric grid and switch over to its own microgrid, powering itself.

New Method for Cleaning Up Nuclear Waste

While the costs associated with storing nuclear waste and the possibility of it leaching into the environment remain legitimate concerns, they may no longer be obstacles on the road to cleaner energy.

Electricity From Trees?

A new finding suggests plants may play a role in electrifying the atmosphere.

Social Media Lend Support to UN's World Water Day

Companies deploy social media to raise awareness and encourage change in honor of World Water Day, March 22.

Greenhouse Gas Can Find a Home Underground

A new study by researchers at MIT shows that there is enough capacity in deep saline aquifers in the United States to store at least a century's worth of carbon dioxide emissions from the nation's coal-fired powerplants. Though questions remain about the economics of systems to capture and store such gases, this study addresses a major issue that has overshadowed such proposals.

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