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Long-term Research Reveals Causes and Consequences of Environmental Change

As global temperatures rise, the most threatened ecosystems are those that depend on a season of snow and ice, scientists from the nation's Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) Network say."The vulnerability of cool, wet areas to climate change is striking," says Julia Jones, a lead author in a special issue of the journal BioScience released today featuring results from more than 30 years of LTER, a program of the National Science Foundation (NSF).

Solar Reactor May Enable Clean Fuel Derived from Sunlight

Producing hydrogen from non-fossil fuel sources is a problem that continues to elude many scientists but University of Delaware’s Erik Koepf thinks he may have discovered a solution.

Fasting for Lent Forces Hyenas to Change Diet

Many Christians give up certain foods for Lent, however ecologists have discovered these changes in human diet have a dramatic impact on the diet of wild animals.

Green Homes Use 80 Percent Less Energy

Clever, inexpensive design can cut the energy used in new homes by up to 80 percent, says a Queensland University of Technology (QUT) researcher.

Mapping Grasslands for Biofuel Potential

USGS scientists have developed a new method for mapping grasslands that demonstrate high potential for biofuel crops with relatively little energy input and environmental impact.

Assessing Protected Area Effectiveness

A new study published in Conservation Letters aims to measure whether parks and reserves in the tropics succeed in protecting forests.

Sediment Chemicals in Coastal Rivers Overall Lower in U.S. than Worldwide Averages

Almost all the sediment-associated chemical concentrations found in 131 of the nation's rivers that drain to the Atlantic, Pacific and Gulf Coasts are lower than worldwide averages, according to a new study by the USGS.

NRC Releases Report on the State of Polar Regions

The U.S. National Research Council (NRC) released a synthesis of reports from thousands of scientists in 60 countries who took part in the International Polar Year (IPY) 2007-08, the first in over 50 years to offer a benchmark for environmental conditions and new discoveries in the polar regions.



Drawing Connections Between Food Webs

Ecosystems today face various threats, from climate change to invasive species to encroaching civilization. If we hope to protect these systems and the species that live in them, we must understand them — an extremely difficult and time-consuming task, given the world's seemingly endless number of ecosystems, each with its own complex dynamics and relationships.

Earth Institute Researchers Develop Interactive Map of NYC's Energy Use

Midtown Manhattan is red hot; Greenpoint a cool yellow and beige. It’s all a matter of energy: A new interactive, color-coded map created by a team at Columbia’s engineering school allows viewers to pinpoint and compare estimated energy usage, building lot by building lot, throughout New York City.

Approximately 80,000 Acres of Guatemala Forest Protected

The Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and partners signed an agreement this month that will safeguard some 80,000 acres of intact forest in Guatemala in the heart of the sprawling Maya Biosphere Reserve. Home to jaguars, macaws, pumas and various wildlife, the protected land will continue to serve as a safe haven to all inhabitants.

New Forage Plant Prepares Farmers for Climate Changes

Researchers, including plant researchers from the University of Copenhagen, have developed a new type of the corn-like crop sorghum, which may become very significant for food supplies in drought-prone areas.

Reforestation Efforts Reshape Hawaii's Soil Hydrology

Starting with the arrival of Polynesian settlers in the fourth century, and peaking in the mid-1800s, the destructive forces of wildfires and pests and the grazing of feral pigs, goats, and cattle reduced the native forests of Maui, Hawaii, to just a tenth of their original extent.

Natural River Networks are Essential for Biodiversity

To alter natural waterways is to take a serious risk of endangering species living on the entire length of a river. In a joint project, scientists from EPFL, EAWAG and Princeton University have modeled the flow of organisms living along river networks. Their research will be published this week in the journal PNAS.

EPA to Allow 15 Percent Renewable Fuel in Gasoline

Agency approves first applications for registration of ethanol to make E15.

Team Releases Findings from 2011 Cruise to Measure the Impacts of Fukushima Radiation

An international research team is reporting the results of a research cruise they organized to study the amount, spread, and impacts of radiation released into the ocean from the tsunami-crippled reactors in Fukushima, Japan.

EPA to Fund Projects to Green Restaurants, Supermarkets and Hotels in New Jersey and New York

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has awarded a total of $441,860 in grants to fund projects in New Jersey and New York that protect people’s health and the environment by preventing pollution.

Realty Company Cited for Violating Federal Law on Notice of Lead-based Paint Hazards

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has cited Crespo Realty, Inc. , of Flushing, N.Y., for allegedly violating a federal law requiring the company to disclose information on lead-based paint hazards to tenants renting four Reading, Pa. properties.

New Report Says Solar Energy Production Much Cleaner than Fossil Fuel

A new report highlights the best practices of photovoltaic (PV) manufacturers to protect workers and the environment during the production of solar panels. It also analyzes investor considerations regarding environmental, social, and governance practices for responsible management of PV companies.

EPA to Conduct First Five-year Review of Hudson River PCB Cleanup

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is currently conducting a five-year review of the cleanup that has been conducted so far on the Hudson River PCBs Superfund site, which extends from Hudson Falls, N.Y., to New York City.

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