News


Plastic Trash Altering Ocean Habitats

A 100-fold upsurge in human-produced plastic garbage in the ocean is altering habitats in the marine environment, according to a new study led by a graduate student researcher at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego.

EPA Adds South Gate Industrial Facilities to List of Worst Toxic Sites in Nation

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is adding two new sites to the Superfund National Priorities List in Los Angeles: Southern Avenue Industrial Area site and Jervis B. Webb Co., former industrial facilities located in South Gate.

Researchers Awarded Grants to Study Algae Fuel Production

Two University of Texas at Austin faculty members have won Moncrief Grand Challenge Faculty Awards to develop computer models for algae-based fuel production and improve the security of coastal waters.

Sygenta Crop Protection to Pay Penalty for Distribution of Misbranded Pesticides in Two States

Syngenta Crop Protection LLC, of Greensboro, N.C., has agreed to pay a $102,000 civil penalty to the United States to settle a series of environmental violations related to the sale or distribution of misbranded pesticides through its facility in Omaha, Neb., and through a farm-supply retailer in Savannah, Mo.

Researchers See Effects of Common Plastic Additive BPA in Monkey Mammary Glands

A new study finds that fetal exposure to the plastic additive bisphenol A, or BPA, alters mammary gland development in primates. The finding adds to the evidence that the chemical can cause health problems in humans and bolsters concerns about it contributing to breast cancer.

New Research Brings Satellite Measurements and Global Climate Models Closer

One popular climate record that shows a slower atmospheric warming trend than other studies contains a data calibration problem, and when the problem is corrected the results fall in line with other records and climate models, according to a new University of Washington study.

Warming Affects Ecosystems Not Just Biodiversity

Ecosystems perform important tasks – like nutrient cycling, breakdown of waste and carbon storage – on which humans depend, so it's important we understand how climate change might affect them.

Toyota Unveils First All Electric SUV

Toyota unveiled Monday what it says is the first all-electric sports utility vehicle (SUV) on the market, a version of its popular RAV4 with a top range of 100 miles and minimum six-hour charge time.



Increasing Speed of Greenland Glaciers Gives New Insight for Rising Sea Level

Changes in the speed that ice travels in more than 200 outlet glaciers indicates that Greenland's contribution to rising sea level in the 21st century might be significantly less than the upper limits some scientists thought possible, a new study shows.

PNNL Technology Wins Award for Improving Submarine Air Quality

Creators of a nanotech-based system that captures carbon dioxide directly from the atmosphere within a submarine, while providing a more environmentally friendly removal process, have won the Federal Laboratory Consortium Interagency Partnership Award for 2012.

The Energy Efficient Soldier

U.S. soldiers are increasingly weighed down by batteries to power weapons, detection devices and communications equipment. So the Army Research Laboratory has awarded a University of Utah-led consortium almost $15 million to use computer simulations to help design materials for lighter-weight, energy efficient devices and batteries.

Idaho Frozen Food Company Pays EPA Penalty for Chemical Reporting Violations

Rhodes International, Inc. will pay over $84,000 to settle hazardous chemical reporting violations at its facility in Caldwell, Idaho, according to a consent agreement with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

EPA Releases Draft Permitting Guidance for Using Diesel Fuel in Oil and Gas Hydraulic Fracturing

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has released a draft underground injection control (UIC) program permitting guidance for class II wells that use diesel fuels during hydraulic fracturing activities.

Study Shows Antarctic Waters Changing due to Climate

The densest waters of Antarctica have reduced dramatically over recent decades, in part due to man-made impacts on the climate, Australian scientists said Friday.

Report Warns of Rapid Decline in U.S. Earth Observation Capabilities

A new National Research Council report says that budget shortfalls, cost-estimate growth, launch failures and changes in mission design and scope have left U.S. earth observation systems in a more precarious position than they were five years ago.

Lightning Signature Could Help Reveal Solar System Origins

An electromagnetic signature called the Schumann Resonance could be used to study other planets besides Earth in the solar system and could shed light on how the solar system formed, according to a paper published in the Astrophysical Journal.

Environment Key to Preventing Childhood Disabilities

The United States government would get a better bang for its health-care buck in managing the country's most prevalent childhood disabilities if it invested more in eliminating socio-environmental risk factors than in developing medicines.

Researchers Honored for Submarine Air Quality System

The United States Navy may deploy the nanotechnology-based system in its submarine fleet, according to the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, which participated in the project.

U.S. Navy Settles Underground Storage Tank Violations at Hampton Roads Facility

The United States Navy will pay a $5,855 pentaly to settle alleged underground storage tank (UST) violations at one of its buildings in Norfolk, Va.

Global Change Puts Plankton Under Threat

Changes in the ocean’s chemistry, as a result of increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) levels, threaten marine plankton to a greater extent than previously thought, according to new research.