News


Columbia Sportswear Company Properly Labels Pesticide Treated Clothing for Domestic Sale

Columbia Sportswear Company, headquartered in Portland, Ore., sold and distributed mislabeled pesticide-treated clothing in violation of federal pesticide rules, according to a settlement with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

As Summer Smog Season Starts, Free Resources Help Protect People

Next week is Air Quality Awareness week – a cooperative effort amongst the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), state environmental agencies, and the National Weather Service, to remind everyone to protect their health by paying attention to local air quality.

First Evaluation of the Clean Water Act's Effects on Coastal Waters Reveals Major Successes

Levels of copper, cadmium, lead and other metals in Southern California's coastal waters have plummeted over the past four decades, according to new research from the University of Southern California (USC).

New Form of Lava Flow on Mars

High-resolution photos of lava flows on Mars reveal coiling spiral patterns that resemble snail or nautilus shells. Such patterns have been found in a few locations on Earth, but never before on Mars. The discovery, made by Arizona State University (ASU) graduate student Andrew Ryan, is announced in a paper published in the scientific journal Science.

Almost Seven Million Birds Perish at Communication Towers in North America Each Year

Every year nearly 7 million birds die as they migrate from the United States and Canada to Central and South America, according to a new University of Southern California (USC) study published in the journal PLoS ONE.

Oil Palm Surging Source of Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Continued expansion of industrial-scale oil palm plantations on the island of Borneo will become a leading cause of greenhouse gas emissions by 2020 unless strong forest and peatland protections are enacted and enforced, according to a National Academy of Sciences study.

Jerome Dairy Processing Facility Failed to Publicly Disclose Chemical Use and Disposal

Idaho Milk Products, Inc., a dairy processing facility in Jerome, Idaho, failed to publicly report the use and disposal of several hundred thousand pounds of toxic chemicals in violation of community right-to-know laws, according to a settlement with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The company has corrected the violations of the Toxics Release Inventory Program and will pay a fine. 

EPA Agreement with Amtrak Brings Greater Drinking Water Protections for Riders

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has entered into an agreement with the National Railroad Passenger Corp. (Amtrak) to ensure safe and reliable drinking water for the railroad’s passengers and crews. To better protect the riding public from illnesses caused by microbiological contamination, the agreement requires Amtrak to monitor all the drinking water systems on its railcars and provide enhanced maintenance for its water systems.



EPA Awards More Than $1 Million to College Teams for Innovative Environmental Solutions

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) awarded more than $1 million in grants to 15 university and college teams from across the country who participated in the 8th Annual National Sustainable Design Expo on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. for their innovative environmental solutions.

Indoor Air Quality in Our Homes, Schools and Workplaces Questioned

According to an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) spokesman, indoor air pollution causes 50 percent of illnesses globally.

Rise in Asian Tiger Shrimp Sightings Prompts Scientific Look at Invasion Concerns

The recent rise in sightings of non-native Asian tiger shrimp off the U.S. Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coasts has government scientists working to determine the cause of the increase and the possible consequences for native fish and seafood in those waters.

First Criminal Charges Filed in BP Oil Spill

Kurt Mix, a former engineer for BP plc, was arrested today on charges of intentionally destroying evidence requested by federal criminal authorities investigating the April 20, 2010, Deepwater Horizon disaster, announced Attorney General Eric Holder, Assistant Attorney General Lanny A. Breuer of the Justice Department’s Criminal Division, U.S. Attorney Jim Letten of the Eastern District of Louisiana and Kevin Perkins, Acting Executive Assistant Director for the FBI’s Criminal Cyber Response and Services Branch.

Researchers Use Weather Model to Recommend East Coast Offshore Wind Farms

Most energy experts agree that cheap, clean, renewable wind energy holds great potential to help the world satisfy energy needs while reducing harmful greenhouse gases. But how can fluctuating wind power be made more consistent to match our power needs?

Marine Scientists Urge Government to Reassess Oil Spill Response

On the second anniversary of the Deepwater Horizon blowout, a national panel of researchers including University of Georgia marine scientist Samantha Joye is urging the federal government to reassess how it would respond to similar oil spills that might occur in the future.

Climate Change May Create Price Volatility in the Corn Market

By the time today's elementary schoolers graduate from college, the U.S. corn belt could be forced to move to the Canadian border to escape devastating heat waves brought on by rising global temperatures. If farmers don't move their corn north, the more frequent heat waves could lead to bigger swings in corn prices -- "price volatility" -- which cause spikes in food prices, farmers' incomes and the price livestock farmers and ethanol producers pay for corn.

U.S. Cities with the Greenest and Least Green Car Shoppers

Cars.com, an online resource for buying and selling new and used vehicles, compiled a list of U.S. cities with the most and least eco-friendly car shoppers. The site looked at search data from its millions of site visitors and determined that, based on their searches for vehicles that get more than 40 mpg, California shoppers are the greenest in the U.S., and Southern states are the least green.

Mobile Lab Takes Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology on the Road

Take some galvanized nails, vinegar, soda pop and copper wire, piece them together just right, and what do you get? A battery.

Mild Winters Are Detrimental to Butterflies

The recent mild winter throughout much of the United States was a cause for celebration for many. However, butterfly aficionados shouldn't be joining in the celebration.

Sunlight, Lime Juice Make Drinking Water Safer, Study Says

Researchers found that adding lime juice to water that is treated with a solar disinfection method removed detectable levels of harmful bacteria.

Lead Dust is Linked to Violence

Childhood exposure to lead dust has been linked to lasting physical and behavioral effects, and now lead dust from vehicles using leaded gasoline has been linked to instances of aggravated assault two decades after exposure, says Tulane toxicologist Howard W. Mielke.