Environmental Protection

Research and Technology


DOE Ups Investment in Electric Vehicle Infrastructure

These technologies will decrease carbon emissions and support DOE's EV Everywhere Grand Challenge to make plug-in electric vehicles as affordable to own and operate as gasoline-powered vehicles by 2022.

The time is right to begin looking beyond the tailpipe and instead consider the full life cycle emissions of vehicles.

Beyond the Tailpipe to Considering Life Cycle Emissions

The time is right to begin looking beyond the tailpipe and instead consider the full life cycle emissions of vehicles. The trend is not unlike what has happened in the construction industry over the last several years.

New biopesticide will help control population of lampreys while also protecting Great Lakes

Lamprey Pheromone Becomes First Vertebrate Pheromone Biopesticide

The EPA has, for the first time ever, registered a sea lamprey mating pheromone as a vertebrate pheromone biopesticide, which will be used to help collect and remove adult lampreys before they have a chance of reproducing.

New USGS Director Confirmed

Dr. Suzette M. Kimball has been leading the agency in an acting capacity since February 2013.

The researchers found that products printed by two of the common types of 3D printer were toxic to zebrafish embryos.

Researchers Raise Toxicity Questions About 3D Printed Parts

Parts from two main classes of commercial 3D printers were found to be toxic to zebrafish embryos.

ArcticNet Scientific Director Wins 2015 Northern Science Award

Dr. Louis Fortier, scientific director of ArcticNet, was awarded the 2015 Northern Science Award on Nov. 18, Polar Knowledge Canada announced.

$20 Million Carbon XPRIZE Contest Under Way

Registration opened Sept. 29 in the contest, which will last 4.5 years, with competing teams challenged to develop breakthrough technologies that convert the most carbon dioxide into one or more products with the highest net value.

A New Analysis and Approach to Watershed Management

UMass Amherst watershed scientists offer national flood and runoff assessment.

A whole house potable water system at a LEED Platinum Certified home in North Carolina collects rainwater from the roofs via leaders and piping and directs it to a series of storage tanks. The potable water tanks are installed in series and connected at the bottom to function as one large tank and to yield a total storage volume of more than 7,000 gallons. (Graphic courtesy of Infiltrator Water Technologies)

Tanks Evolve to Meet Advanced Wastewater Treatment and Water Reuse Demand

The evolved plastic tank is quickly becoming accepted by contractors, designers, and homeowners and because of the variety of size options available to satisfy varying needs.

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Let's Be Frank about Fracking: Is Unconventional Gas and Oil Drilling Really Worth It?

Linked to earthquakes, water contamination, and general pollution, fracking becomes more controversial by the day. Meanwhile, 13,000 new wells are being drilled every year. There have been over a thousand documented cases of water contamination next to areas of gas drilling—cases of sensory, respiratory, cardiovascular and neurological damage. From the water we drink to the ground beneath our feet, is it too late to ask, “What gives?”

Pollution Versus Pollination: Losing Our Natural Resources from A to Zinc

Pollution Versus Pollination: Losing Our Natural Resources from A to Zinc

Two new studies are highlighting the decreasing numbers of food pollinators and the increasing levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide.

The Cascadia Fault: Overlooked and Underprepared

The Cascadia Fault: Overlooked and Underprepared

North of the San Andreas Fault is the lesser known and far more insidious subduction zone running 750 miles from Vancouver to Northern California.

Stricter Ozone Standards Could Pose Challenges for Scientific Measurements and Models

Stricter Ozone Standards Could Pose Challenges for Scientific Measurements and Models

With the EPA proposing to lower the primary ozone standard from 75 ppb to 70 or 65 ppb, researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder and the NOAA have created a commentary on how the new standard could make research more difficult for air quality managers at both local and state levels.

Study Finds Fine Particulate Air Pollution Associated with Increased Risk of Autism

Exposure to the pollution caused by such things as car exhaust and coal-fired power plants may be associated with an increased risk of autism spectrum disorder, a University of Pittsburgh study has found.

Interxion Groundwater System Cools Data Center

By agreement with the Capital Region of Denmark, the system will also act as a remediation system, preventing polluted water running into the great groundwater reservoirs, from which the capital collects its drinking water.

Ohio State Researchers Develop Mesh that Captures Oil

The researchers coated the mesh with a fine layer of hydrogen and carbon, putting the elements together in such a way to attract water and repel oil.

Report: Southern California's Air Some of the Worst in U.S.

Despite progress, Southern California's air remains home to some of the worst air in the United States, the American Lung Association said Tuesday in its annual State of the Air report.

Earth Day Turns 45, but Local Groups Say We

Earth Day Turns 45, but Local Groups Say We've Got a Ways to Go

In the 21st century, the big challenge facing the world is climate change.

Some locations, operations, or hazmat personnel may require security awareness training that includes security risks associated with their specific tasks and methods designed to enhance security.

NHTSA Stresses Fuel Efficiency for Earth Day

EPA and the DOT agency will finalize a new set of longer-term medium- and heavy-duty truck fuel efficiency standards in 2016.

After taking seawater samples from the shoreline of Ucluelet, British Columbia, scientists from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) discovered small amounts of radioactivity from the 2011 Fukushima nuclear power plant accident.

Traces of Radiation from Fukushima Found on British Columbia Shores

After taking seawater samples from the shoreline of Ucluelet, British Columbia, scientists from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) discovered small amounts of radioactivity from the 2011 Fukushima nuclear power plant accident.

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