California Companies Recieve Statewide Recognition for Achievements in Product Stewardship

Four California businesses were honored by the California Product Ste wardship Council (CPSC) during the organization’s Arrow Awards ceremony in Oakland, CA at the California Resource Recovery Association’s 36th annual conference.

Diversity Keeps Grasslands Resilient to Drought Climate Change

For much of the year drought has been plaguing American grasslands. But a recent study found that grasses do not appear to be losing the turf war against climate when it comes to surviving with little precipitation.

Study Discovers New Atmospheric Compound Tied to Climate Change Human Health

An international research team led by the University of Colorado Boulder and the University of Helsinki has discovered a surprising new chemical compound in Earth's atmosphere that reacts with sulfur dioxide to form sulfuric acid, which is known to have significant impacts on climate and health.

New Global Warming Culprit: Methane Emissions Jump Dramatically During Dam Drawdowns

Washington State University researchers have documented an underappreciated suite of players in global warming: dams, the water reservoirs behind them, and surges of greenhouse gases as water levels go up and down.

Asia, U.S. Plains Facing Water Extraction Crisis

Heavily-populated regions of Asia, the arid Middle East and parts of the US corn belt are dangerously over-exploiting their underground water supplies, according to a study published on Wednesday in the journal Nature.

Report Puts Lens on Built Environment's Link to Asthma

The design firm Perkins+Will has released what it calls the first-ever report on asthmagens and asthma triggers in building materials and products.

Google Self-Driving Cars Pass 300,000 Mile Mark

Google has just released an update on its blog boasting about how its fleet of self-driving cars which the company has designed and is operating on public roads, have collectively racked up over 300,000 miles of driving operations, with nary a single accident, at least while being driven by the computer.

The Economic Cost of Increased Temperatures

Even temporary rises in local temperatures significantly damage long-term economic growth in the world's developing nations, according to a new study co-authored by an MIT economist.

Increased Productivity, Not Less Energy Use, Results From More Efficient Lighting

Two researchers have reprised in the journal Energy Policy their groundbreaking finding that improvements in lighting — from candles to gas lamps to electric bulbs — historically have led to increased light consumption rather than lower overall energy use by society.

Mapping Tool Expanded to Include Arctic Waters

NOAA and the Interior Department's Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement have expanded the online mapping tool used by emergency responders during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill response to include the Arctic, calling this step important for any response needed in the region.

How Forests Thrive After Fires and Volcanoes

Forests hammered by windstorms, avalanches and wildfires may appear blighted, but a Washington State University researcher says such disturbances can be key to maximizing an area's biological diversity.

EPA Announces Funding for Research to Improve Air Quality, Protect Health

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) awarded five grants totaling almost $2 million to academic institutions for research on innovative processes to further improve air quality in the U.S. and help track the effectiveness of pollution control measures.

Microbes, Sponges, and Worms Add to Coral Reef Woes

Microbes, sponges, and worms -- the side effects of pollution and heavy fishing -- are adding insult to injury in Kenya's imperiled reef systems, according to a recent study by the Wildlife Conservation Society and the University of Azores.

Researchers Find Substantial Water Pollution Risks From Fracking to Recover Natural Gas

Stony Brook University scientists have found that the disposal of contaminated wastewater from hydraulic fracturing – commonly known as “fracking” – wells producing natural gas in the Marcellus Shale region poses substantial potential risks of river and other water pollution that suggests additional regulation to reduce the potential of drinking water contamination.

Research Links Extreme Summer Heat Events to Global Warming

A new statistical analysis by NASA scientists has found that Earth's land areas have become much more likely to experience an extreme summer heat wave than they were in the middle of the 20th century.

Bringing Power to the People -- and Heat as Well

In some isolated clinics in parts of Africa, the electricity needed to power lights and medical devices is generated by expensive imported diesel fuel; the water supply can be so cold in winter that health workers can’t even wash their hands properly. But a startup company established by a team of MIT students and alumni aims to change that.

Crayfish Species Proves to Be the Ultimate Survivor

One of the most invasive species on the planet is able to source food from the land as well as its usual food sources in the water, research from Queen Mary, University of London has found.

Birds That Live With Varying Weather Sing More Versatile Songs

A new study of North American songbirds reveals that birds that live with fluctuating weather are more flexible singers.

Michigan Town Supervisor Sentenced to Three Years in Prison For Conspiring to Defraud HUD

William Morgan, the former supervisor of Royal Oak Township, a suburb of Detroit, was sentenced in federal court to three years in prison. Mr. Morgan had previously entered a guilty plea to charges that he conspired to defraud the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), violate the Clean Air Act’s asbestos requirements, and commit bribery.

New Technology Reduces Risk of Mercury Vapor Exposure in Flourescent Lamp Packaging

The popularity of fluorescent lamps and compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) is steadily growing in the industrial, commercial and residential markets. However, they can also be potentially dangerous because of their mercury content.