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Tips Tuesday: Encouraging Sustainable Behavior In, Away From the Workplace

Four tips to encourage sustainable behavior among employees both in and away from the workplace.

Scientists Suggest Solutions for a Nitrogen-soaked World

Nitrogen is both an essential nutrient and a pollutant, a byproduct of fossil fuel combustion and a fertilizer that feeds billions, a benefit and a hazard, depending on form, location, and quantity.

Major Environmental Sudy Finds Traces of Many Drugs in Swedish Waters

High levels of the anti-inflammatory substance diclofenac are released from wastewater plants, according to a study from IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute and Umeå University that was commissioned by the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency (Swedish EPA).

Economic Incentives Could Massively Reduce Deforestation Emissions in Indonesia

Indonesia has the potential to realize major reductions in national greenhouse gas emissions from deforestation, and simultaneously earn significant new income for national and regional governments, if policies to Reduce Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation (REDD+) are developed with strong and specific economic incentives, said scientists in a new paper published in the leading scientific journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Massachusetts Schools Install Solar Photovoltaic Electricity Generating System

Ambitious solar initiative at Natick, Mass., schools and buildings will reduce energy consumption and provide educational and learning opportunities.

Managing Private and Public Adaptation to Climate Change

New research has found that individuals and the private sector have an important role to play in the provision of public policies to help society adapt to the impacts of climate change.

New Study Urges Smart Targeting of Pollution Sources to Save Lives and Climate

Researchers at the Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI) at the University of York (York) have played a key role in a new study that shows that implementing 14 key air pollution control measures could slow the pace of global warming, save millions of lives and boost agricultural production.

Check Out the World’s Fastest Vegetable-oil-fueled Vehicle

The world’s fastest vegetable oil-fueled vehicle – conceived, built and driven by a team of Boise State University undergraduate students dubbed Greenspeed – will be on display Jan. 26-Feb. 5 at the Washington Auto Show in Washington, D.C.



Diverse Ecosystems are Crucial Climate Change Buffer

Preserving diverse plant life will be crucial to buffer the negative effects of climate change and desertification in in the world's drylands, according to a new landmark study.

Fungi: An Unexpected Ally Against Hazardous Lead Pollution

Fungi may be unexpected allies in our efforts to keep hazardous lead under control.

NREL Help Virgin Islands Cut Fuel Use

The tiny U.S. territory in the Caribbean has just 110,000 residents, all the beach, surf, wind and sun you'd ever want. The downside to this oasis is energy prices that are four to five times higher than are paid in the continental United States.

Fish Offspring Grow Best at Same Temperature as Parents

Fish parents can pre-condition their offspring to grow fastest at the temperature they experienced, according to research published in the February 2012 edition of Ecology Letters. This pre-conditioning, known as transgenerational plasticity (TGP), occurs whenever environmental cues experienced by either parent prior to fertilization changes how their offspring respond to the environment.

One-third of Car Fuel Consumption is Due to Friction Loss

No less than one third of a car's fuel consumption is spent in overcoming friction. This friction loss has a direct impact on both fuel consumption and emissions. However, new technology can reduce friction from 10 to 80 percent in various components of a car, according to a joint study by VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland and Argonne National Laboratory in the United States.

Sunflower Pattern Inspires New Concentrated Solar Power Plant Design To Increase Power Generation

Just outside Seville, in the desert region of Andalucia, Spain, sits an oasis-like sight: a 100-meter-high pillar surrounded by rows of giant mirrors rippling outward. More than 600 of these mirrors, each the size of half a tennis court, track the sun throughout the day, concentrating its rays on the central tower, where the sun’s heat is converted to electricity — enough to power 6,000 homes.

Maine DEP, The Nature Conservancy & Army Corps Announces $2.4 Million Awarded to Conserve Natural Resources in Maine

More than two million dollars will help public and non-profit groups restore and protect high priority wetlands and other natural resources across Maine.

Check Out the First-ever Portable Fuel Cell Charger That Runs on Water

PowerTrekk, a cutting-edge product that uses clean fuel cell technology that efficiently converts hydrogen into electricity.

Study Confirms Nature Responsible for 90 Percent of the Earth's Atmospheric Acidity

Satellites showing that nature is responsible for 90 percent of the earth’s atmospheric acidity shocked researchers from the Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy, whose findings have just been published in the journal Nature Geoscience.

Electronic Atlas Maps U.S. Renewable Energy Resources

A new geospatial application developed by the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the U.S. Department of Energy's primary national laboratory for renewable energy and energy efficiency research and development, allows users to easily and accurately map potential renewable energy resources in the United States.

Scientists Study How Nature Cleans Uranium From Colorado Aquifer

Rifle, Colo., is a small town on the Colorado River, in the heart of the Rocky Mountains, that's big on natural resources. It attracts hunters, fishermen, hikers, rock climbers. Its striking scenery attracted husband-and-wife environmental artists Christo and Jeanne-Claude as well; they stretched the Valley Curtain, a 200,200-square-foot orange sheet of nylon, across 1,250-foot-wide Rifle Gap. The curtain lasted only 28 hours before another of the area's natural resources, wind, began to tear it down.

Reuse of Municipal Wastewater Has Potential to Augment Future Drinking Water Supplies

With recent advances in technology and design, treating municipal wastewater and reusing it for drinking water, irrigation, industry and other applications could significantly increase the nation's total available water resources, particularly in coastal areas facing water shortages, says a new report from the National Research Council.

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