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Greenhouse Gases Causing More Frequent Extreme Summer Temps

Extreme summer temperatures are already occurring more frequently in the United States, and will become normal by mid-century if the world continues on a business as usual schedule of emitting greenhouse gases.

Food Choices Leading Cause of Environmental Damage in Australia

Australians are eating themselves to death and food choices are one of the nation's leading causes of environmental damage, according to a new report released by the Public Health Association of Australia (PHAA).

EPA Seeks Public Input on Plan for Cleanup at Superfund Site in N.J.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed a cleanup plan for contaminated soil, ground water and six waste disposal areas at the American Cyanamid Superfund Site in Bridgewater Township, N.J., located on the Raritan River.

University of Arizona Tests Consumer Water Filters for Contaminant Removal

The University of Arizona (UA) conducted a study on refrigerator water filtration devices and chemical removal effectiveness.

Time of Year Significant in Projections of Climate Change Effects

Does it matter whether long periods of hot weather happen in June or July, August or September? Scientists studying the subtle effects of heat waves and droughts say that when such events happen makes a big difference.

Effects of Sea Spray Geoengineering on Global Climate

Anthropogenic climate warming is leading to consideration of options for geoengineering to offset rising carbon dioxide levels. One potential technique involves injecting artificial sea spray into the atmosphere. The sea salt particles would affect Earth's radiation budget directly, by scattering incoming solar radiation, and indirectly, by acting as cloud condensation nuclei, which could lead to whiter clouds that reflect more radiation.

Oxford University Study Suggest Productive Farms Can Be Greener Than Organic

Farms that aim for high food production using environmentally friendly practices could be better for the environment than both organic and conventional farms.

Researchers Examine Monitoring Systems for Offshore Wind Energy Impacts

The next generation of wind energy facilities in the United States may be built offshore where winds are stronger, floating platforms could be utilized, and links to power grids may already exist.



High Carbon Estimates for Endangered Madagascar

By combining airborne laser technology, satellite mapping, and ground-based plot surveys, a team of researchers has produced the first large-scale, high-resolution estimates of carbon stocks in remote and fragile Madagascar.

Even Moderate Air Pollution Can Raise Stroke Risks

Air pollution, even at levels generally considered safe by federal regulations, increases the risk of stroke by 34 percent, according to researchers from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, a patient care, teaching and research affiliate of Harvard Medical School.

Expert Reveals The Art of Shutting Down a Nuclear Plant

Gaëtan Girardin, researcher in nuclear engineering, gives us the key to understanding nuclear reactor safety. While the disaster at Fukushima is at the center of our conversation, the recent and minor incident at the Mühleberg plant (Switzerland) is also discussed.

Environment Canada Cuts Threaten Science, International Agreements

Recent cuts to the scientific workforce of Environment Canada, a government agency responsible for meteorological services and environmental research, threaten scientific research related to the ozone layer in the upper atmosphere and pollution in the lower atmosphere, according to environmental scientists in the U.S. These reductions in personnel and projected budget cuts also threaten existing international agreements.

Children At Risk for Ingestion of PAHs from Pavement Sealant

A recent study found that children living near coal-tar-sealed pavement are likely to receive a far higher dose of carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from incidental ingestion of house dust than do children living near unsealed pavement, and that dose is more than two times higher than the PAH dose children are estimated to receive from food.

Gas Mileage of New Vehicles at All-time High

Fuel economy of all new vehicles sold in the United States last month was at its highest mark ever, say researchers at the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute.

EPA 2013 Budget Proposal Focuses on Core Environmental and Human Health Protections

The Obama Administration recently proposed a FY 2013 budget of $8.344 billion for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This budget reflects a government-wide effort to reduce spending and find cost-savings, and is $105 million below the EPA’s enacted level for FY 2012.

Could China's Electric Car Pollution Be More Harmful Than Gasoline Cars?

Electric cars have been heralded as environmentally friendly, but findings from University of Tennessee, Knoxville, researchers show that electric cars in China have an overall impact on pollution that could be more harmful to health than gasoline vehicles.

Research Shows Promise in Converting Camelina Oil into Jet Fuel

Researchers at Montana State University-Northern have developed a process to convert camelina oil to jet fuel and other high-value chemicals. MSU has applied for a U.S. patent and research is ongoing.

Industry Progressing in Voluntary Effort to Reduce Toxic Chemicals

Companies have successfully developed more than150 alternatives to long-chain perfluorinated chemicals.

Environment's Effects on Evolution of Survival Traits

Advances in studying genes mean that scientists in evolutionary developmental biology or “evo-devo” can now explain more clearly than ever before how bats got wings, the turtle got its shell and blind cave fish lost their eyes, says University of Massachusetts Amherst evolutionary biologist Craig Albertson.

Environmentalists Encourage Companies to Pay Up Front for Potential Environmental Disasters

Whether it’s building an oil pipeline, drilling for fuel in the ocean or “fracking” to flush natural gas out of the Earth, we’re often asked to believe the process is safe, when companies want to do something that could have big benefits. But that process also could be potentially disastrous for the environment.

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