Environmental Protection


EPA Reaches Settlement for Occidental Chemical Corp. Superfund Site Cleanup Costs

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently announced that current and former owners and operators of the Occidental Chemical Corporation Superfund Site in Lower Pottsgrove Township, Montgomery County, Pa. have agreed to pay $2.1 million in past cleanup costs for the site.

Expansion of the Panama Canal has Positive Effect for the Environment

Expansion of one of the world's most important shipping routes brings with it a unique opportunity to reduce the carbon footprint of the marine industry, experts claim.

Can Bacteria Lower Groundwater Concentration Levels?

Research conducted by the team at the Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site in Rifle, Colo. has shown that indigenous bacteria can be stimulated to immobilize the uranium, resulting in groundwater concentrations below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency standard.

White Roofs to Make for Cooler Melbourne Buildings

The research assesses the benefits of white roofs and aims to help residential, commercial and industrial building owners determine if white roofs are suitable for their buildings and guide them through the best materials to use.

Tips Tuesday: Minimize, Eliminate Environmental Risks Associated with Runoff from Rainfall, Snowmelt

Here are relatively simple and inexpensive best management practices that can minimize or eliminate environmental risks associated with runoff from rainfall and snowmelt.

Researchers Gather to Refine Carbon Budget for U.S. East Coast

A group of 35 researchers from institutions all along the eastern seaboard gathered at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science last week to further integrate and refine field measurements and computer models of carbon cycling in the waters along the U.S. East Coast.

Broadcast Study of Ocean Acidification to Date Helps Scientists Evaluate Effects on Marine Life

Might a penguin's next meal be affected by the exhaust from your tailpipe? The answer may be yes, when you add your exhaust fumes to the total amount of carbon dioxide lofted into the atmosphere by humans since the industrial revolution. One-third of that carbon dioxide is absorbed by the world's oceans, making them more acidic and affecting marine life.

EPA Environmental Justice Grant to Help Farm Workers Reduce Pesticide Risks

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is providing a $25,000 grant to the Comite de Apoyo a los Trabajadores Agrícolas (CATA) to reduce exposure to pesticides for farm workers in southern New Jersey.

Researchers Study Potential Effects of Geoengineering on Global Food Supply

Carbon dioxide emissions from the burning of coal, oil, and gas have been increasing over the past decades, causing the Earth to get hotter and hotter. There are concerns that a continuation of these trends could have catastrophic effects, including crop failures in the heat-stressed tropics. This has led some to explore drastic ideas for combating global warming, including the idea of trying to counteract it by reflecting sunlight away from the Earth.

Tweaking the Tiniest of Parts Yields Big Jump in Efficiency in Solar Cells

By tweaking the smallest of parts, a trio of University at Buffalo engineers is hoping to dramatically increase the amount of sunlight that solar cells convert into electricity.

Study Says Lease Option Increases Rooftop Solars Appeal

Rooftop solar panels are attracting a new demographic of customers who are choosing to lease rather than buy, and enjoying the low upfront costs and immediate savings.

EIA Annual Energy Outlook

The Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (AEO2012) Reference case recently released by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) presents updated projections for U.S. energy markets through 2035. The Reference case projections include only the effects of policies that have been implemented in law or final regulations.

Toward Twister Forecasting: Scientists Make Progress in Assessing Tornado Seasons

Meteorologists can see a busy hurricane season brewing months ahead, but until now there has been no such crystal ball for tornadoes, which are much smaller and more volatile.

Metal Oxide Simulations Could Help Green Technology

University of California, Davis, researchers have proposed a radical new way of thinking about the chemical reactions between water and metal oxides, the most common minerals on Earth.

Thawing Arctic Tundra Presents Climate Threat

A significant source of greenhouse gases has started leaking into the Earth's atmosphere from an unlikely place. Above the Arctic Circle, land frozen for tens of thousands of years has begun to thaw for the first time. Current estimates indicate that perennially frozen ground, called permafrost, holds more than twice the amount of carbon present in today's atmosphere. As permafrost thaws, a huge amount of this stored carbon could be released as carbon dioxide or methane gas.

Efforts to Control the Mississippi River Result in Flooded Farmland and Permanent Damage

When the water in the Mississippi River rose to 58 feet with a forecast of 60 feet or higher in May 2011, the emergency plan to naturally or intentionally breach the levees, established over 80 years prior, was put in motion. The flood of 1937 did top the frontline levee and water passed into and through the New Madrid Floodway, but being floodfree since then caused area landowners to oppose the plan being put into action.

Study Finds Mysterious Flotsam in Gulf of Mexico Came from Deepwater Horizon Rig

Shortly after the Deepwater Horizon disaster, mysterious honeycomb material was found floating in the Gulf of Mexico and along coastal beaches. Using state-of-the-art chemical forensics and a bit of old-fashioned detective work, a research team led by scientists at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) confirmed that the flotsam were pieces of material used to maintain buoyancy of the pipe bringing up oil from the seafloor.

Guidebook Provides Framework for Managing U.S. Forests in Face of Climate Change

Resource managers at the nation's 155 national forests now have a set of science-based guidelines to help them manage their landscapes for resilience to climate change.

Acid Rain Study Show Substantial Decreases

Measurable improvements in air quality and visibility, human health, and water quality in many acid-sensitive lakes and streams, have been achieved through emissions reductions from electric generating power plants and resulting decreases in acid rain. These are some of the key findings in a report to Congress by the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program, a cooperative federal program.

Can We Engineer Our Way Out of Global Warming?

Engineering our way out of global climate warming may not be as easy as simply reducing the incoming solar energy, according to a team of University of Bristol and Penn State climate scientists. Designing the approach to control both sea level rise and rates of surface air temperature changes requires abalancing act to accommodate the diverging needs of different locations.

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