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Taking Biofuel from Forest to Highway

The world is moving from a hydrocarbon economy to a carbohydrate economy, according to University of British Columbia biofuel expert Jack Saddler. Sadler will present his work at the 2012 Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in Vancouver on Feb. 17.

Cleanup Brings Milwaukee Area Closer to Restoration

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources and Milwaukee County recently announced completion of contaminated sediment removal in Lincoln Creek and the Milwaukee River Channel. This project brings the Milwaukee Estuary closer to being removed from a binational list of Areas of Concern in the Great Lakes.

Commission for Environmental Cooperation Provides Grants for Environmental Problems in North America

Commission for Environmental Cooperation (CEC) council members including U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Lisa P. Jackson announced the winners of more than $1.3 million of grants under the CEC’s North American Partnership for Environmental Community Action (NAPECA) program.

Deepwater Horizon Disaster Could have Billion Dollar Impact

The Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico in April 2010 will have a large economic impact on the U.S. Gulf fisheries.

Human Evolution Linked to Climate Change?

It’s not a take on climate change we often hear about. However, one man believes the two are connected.

EPA Issues Permit for Stormwater Discharges from Construction Sites

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is issuing a new permit, in accordance with the Clean Water Act, that will provide streamlined permitting to thousands of construction operators, while protecting our nation’s waterways from discharges of polluted stormwater from construction sites.

New Study Shows No Evidence of Groundwater Contamination from Hydraulic Fracturing

Wait. What? Hydraulic fracturing of shale formations to extract natural gas has no direct connection to reports of groundwater contamination, based on evidence reviewed in a study released by the Energy Institute at The University of Texas at Austin.

Indigenous People's Water Supply Polluted by Climate Change Effects

Indigenous people around the world are among the most vulnerable to climate change and are increasingly susceptible to the pathogen loads found in potable water after heavy rainfall or rapid snow melt.



UC-Irvine Smart Labs Cut Energy Use in Half

If research labs account for two-thirds of a campus's carbon footprint, it doesn't take an Einstein to target them for energy savings.

Greenhouse Gases Causing More Frequent Extreme Summer Temps

Extreme summer temperatures are already occurring more frequently in the United States, and will become normal by mid-century if the world continues on a business as usual schedule of emitting greenhouse gases.

No Quick Fix for Low Carbon Technologies

Could replacing coal-fired electricity plants with generators fueled by natural gas bring global warming to a halt in this century? What about rapid construction of massive numbers of solar or wind farms, hydroelectric dams, or nuclear reactors—or the invention of new technology for capturing the carbon dioxide produced by fossil-fueled power plants and storing it permanently underground?

EPA Seeks Public Input on Plan for Cleanup at Superfund Site in N.J.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed a cleanup plan for contaminated soil, ground water and six waste disposal areas at the American Cyanamid Superfund Site in Bridgewater Township, N.J., located on the Raritan River.

Food Choices Leading Cause of Environmental Damage in Australia

Australians are eating themselves to death and food choices are one of the nation's leading causes of environmental damage, according to a new report released by the Public Health Association of Australia (PHAA).

University of Arizona Tests Consumer Water Filters for Contaminant Removal

The University of Arizona (UA) conducted a study on refrigerator water filtration devices and chemical removal effectiveness.

Time of Year Significant in Projections of Climate Change Effects

Does it matter whether long periods of hot weather happen in June or July, August or September? Scientists studying the subtle effects of heat waves and droughts say that when such events happen makes a big difference.

Effects of Sea Spray Geoengineering on Global Climate

Anthropogenic climate warming is leading to consideration of options for geoengineering to offset rising carbon dioxide levels. One potential technique involves injecting artificial sea spray into the atmosphere. The sea salt particles would affect Earth's radiation budget directly, by scattering incoming solar radiation, and indirectly, by acting as cloud condensation nuclei, which could lead to whiter clouds that reflect more radiation.

Oxford University Study Suggest Productive Farms Can Be Greener Than Organic

Farms that aim for high food production using environmentally friendly practices could be better for the environment than both organic and conventional farms.

Researchers Examine Monitoring Systems for Offshore Wind Energy Impacts

The next generation of wind energy facilities in the United States may be built offshore where winds are stronger, floating platforms could be utilized, and links to power grids may already exist.

High Carbon Estimates for Endangered Madagascar

By combining airborne laser technology, satellite mapping, and ground-based plot surveys, a team of researchers has produced the first large-scale, high-resolution estimates of carbon stocks in remote and fragile Madagascar.

Even Moderate Air Pollution Can Raise Stroke Risks

Air pollution, even at levels generally considered safe by federal regulations, increases the risk of stroke by 34 percent, according to researchers from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, a patient care, teaching and research affiliate of Harvard Medical School.

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