Environmental Protection

News


Princeton System Tracks Drought to Aid Disaster Relief

Drought is often the precursor to disaster, but getting leads on its stealthy approach through remote or war-torn areas can be so difficult that relief agencies sometimes have little time to react before a bad situation becomes a calamity.

Study Suggests Nation's Urban Forests Losing Ground

National results indicate that tree cover in urban areas of the United States is declining at a rate of about four million trees per year, according to a U.S. Forest Service study published recently in Urban Forestry & Urban Greening.

Earliest Horses Show Past Global Warming Affected Body Size of Mammals

As scientists continue developing climate change projection models, paleontologists studying an extreme short-term global warming event have discovered direct evidence about how mammals respond to rising temperatures.

Can Digital Games and Virtual Worlds Help Us Save Nature?

Conservation scientists Bruno Monteferri, Chris Sandbrook and Bill Adams explore whether computer gaming is a new frontier for conservation.

DFW Airport Partners with EPA to Save Energy and Resources

Dallas/Fort Worth (DFW) International Airport has entered into a Sustainability Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Officials from DFW Airport and the EPA signed a Memorandum of Understanding during a ceremony at the airport on Feb. 22.

EPA Funds University of Hawaii Marine Debris Research Project

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has recently provided $15,000 in funding to the University of Hawaii to further research efforts on marine debris.

Blue Bird Bus Engines Earn EPA, CARB Certification

The buses operate with near-zero emissions, according to the company.

Spinning Turbines to Power Texas Water Tower

An educational facility to teach residents and school groups about wind energy and water distribution is in the base of the tower being completed in Addison, Texas, a city of about 15,000 residents on the northern rim of Dallas.



Charging Up the Auto Industry

This year's iconic North American International Auto Show featured a wave of new hybrid and electric cars that suggest the vehicles have truly come into their own. But what's the future for the technology needed to power these cars? In particular, can the industry really expect in the coming years an electric car battery that is not only economical, but delivers the performance needed to make these cars a common site on the streets?

Energy Star Leaders Achieve President's Energy Efficiency Goal for Buildings

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced that nearly half of the organizations recognized as Energy Star Leaders have improved the energy efficiency of their building portfolios by 20 percent or more. Last year, President Obama announced a nationwide call to action to improve the energy performance in buildings across the nation by 20 percent by 2020.

Italian Researcher Invents Floating Solar Panels

Marco Rosa-Clot, a professor at Florence University, has introduced his new project that addresses the limited-space concerns of photovoltaic panels: The Floating Tracking Cooling Concentrator (FTCC) System, which harnesses small basins and natural and artificial lakes to install PV plants.

Man Pleads Guilty to Illegal Dumping in Upstate New York

Julius DeSimone defrauded the United States and violated Clean Water Act.

Using the Past to Improve Ecological Forecasting

To better predict the future, Jack Williams is looking to the past.

Guam Waterworks Authority Receives $6.7 million for Wastewater and Drinking Water Projects

EPA recently awarded more than $6.7 million as part of a yearly grant to the Guam Waterworks Authority to improve drinking water and wastewater systems on Guam.

Climate Change Puts Future Food Production at Risk

Global warming caused by greenhouse gases could increase the variability of summertime temperatures around the world by the end of the century, according to a University of Washington (UW) climate scientist.

World's Oceans Get an Acid Bath

Among the repercussions of global climate change, the effect of ocean acidification on marine life is one of the least-understood variables.

University of Illinois Carbon Storage Project

Geologists are hoping to learn a great deal about geologic carbon sequestration from injecting 1 million metric tons of carbon dioxide into sandstone 7,000 feet beneath Decatur, Ill. And they're hoping the public learns a lot from the endeavor, too.

Scientists Unveil a New Economic and Environmental Index

A growing world population, mixed with the threat of climate change and mounting financial problems, has prompted University of British Columbia researchers to measure the overall 'health' of 152 countries around the world.

Smart Grids Could Outsmart Criminals

Your smartphone uses broadband to connect you to the world. But when charging it, you're relying on an electrical system that was designed and built in the era of the rotary phone.

Coastal Drinking Water More Vulnerable To Water Use Than Climate Change

Human activity is likely a greater threat to coastal groundwater used for drinking water supplies than rising sea levels from climate change, according to a study conducted by geoscientists from the University of Saskatchewan and McGill University in Montreal.

Free e-News Subscription

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy