Environmental Protection

News


Experts Call on Governments, Industries and The Water and Trade Research Communities

With greater water scarcity in some regions and increasing global demand for high quality water, international trade agreements need to help save water globally.

Ottawa Cannot Legislate Climate Change Policy

Earlier this year the federal government introduced sector-by-sector emissions reduction regulations as its stand on climate change. However, according to Prof. Al Lucas and co-author Jenette Yearsley, the Constitution limits Ottawa's ability to enact climate change legislation limiting greenhouse gas emissions.

Coral Reefs in Warming Seas

Disease outbreaks are often associated with hot weather. Because many bacteria typically multiply more rapidly in warmer conditions, it's a commonly held notion that warm-weather outbreaks are a straightforward consequence of greater numbers of the microbial culprit.

For Midwesterners, More Boxcars Mean Cleaner Air

Shifting a fraction of truck-borne freight onto trains would have an outsized impact on air quality in the Midwest, according to researchers at the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

New Scientific Review Highlights Biodiversity and Climate Change

A major new scientific review, involving more than 30 scientists from Australia, New Zealand and the Pacific Islands sets out our current knowledge of the impacts of climate change on biodiversity in the latest special edition of the scientific journal Pacific Conservation Biology.

Landsat Satellites Track Yellowstone's Underground Heat

Yellowstone National Park sits on top of a vast, ancient, and still active volcano. Heat pours off its underground magma chamber, and is the fuel for Yellowstone's famous features -- more than 10,000 hot springs, mud pots, terraces and geysers, including Old Faithful.

Researchers Assess Radioactivity Released to the Ocean from the Fukushima Nuclear Facility

With news this week of additional radioactive leaks from Fukushima nuclear power plants, the impact on the ocean of releases of radioactivity from the plants remains unclear. But a new study by U.S. and Japanese researchers analyzes the levels of radioactivity discharged from the facility in the first four months after the accident and draws some basic conclusions about the history of contaminant releases to the ocean.

EPA and New York State Announce Ban on Dumping Sewage from Boats into Lake Ontario

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation recently announced that a 3,675 square mile area of Lake Ontario is now a “no discharge zone,” which means that boats are completely banned from discharging sewage into the water.



Sewage Treatment Plants May Contribute to Antibiotic Resistance Problem

Water discharged into lakes and rivers from municipal sewage treatment plants may contain significant concentrations of the genes that make bacteria antibiotic-resistant. That's the conclusion of a new study on a sewage treatment plant on Lake Superior in the Duluth, Minn., harbor that appears in American Chemical Society's journal Environmental Science & Technology.

Wireless Sensor Device Rapidly Detects E. coli in Water Samples

Fecal contamination of public beaches caused by sewage overflow is both dangerous for swimmers and costly for state and local economies.

Insecticides an Increasing Problem in Future for Streams in Europe

The risks for streams caused by the use of insecticides in agriculture will increase significantly in many regions of Europe, and particularly in Scandinavia, the Baltic countries and in Central Europe, according to scientists in the journal Ecological Applications.

EPA Funding to Reduce Air Pollution from Locomotives and Buses Operating in New York City

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is helping New York City reduce air pollution with a $2 million grant to replace two old high polluting locomotive engines that operate in Brooklyn, the Bronx and Queens with cleaner technology.

New Study Puts Eco-labels To The Test

A new report by the University of Victoria ranks eco-labels intended to distinguish seafood produced with less damage to the environment. It is the first study to evaluate how eco-labels for farmed marine fish compare to unlabeled options in the marketplace.

FSU Researcher Finds Key to Ancient Weather Patterns in Florida Caves

Darrel Tremaine, a Florida State University (FSU) doctoral oceanography student, has been known to go to extremes for his research, such as crawling on his hands and knees through a dark, muddy limestone cave in Northwest Florida to learn more about ancient weather patterns.

Today's Severe Drought, Tomorrow's Normal

While the worst drought since the Dust Bowl of the 1930s grips Oklahoma and Texas, scientists are warning that what we consider severe drought conditions in North America today may be normal for the continent by the mid-21st century, due to a continuously warming planet.

EPA To Provide Nearly $2 Million to Revitalize U.S. Urban Waters

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced it will provide up to $1.8 million for projects across the country to protect Americans’ health and help restore urban waters by improving water quality and supporting community revitalization.

Study: U.S. Electric Grid Can Handle Unprecedented Technological Challenges

Over the next two decades, the U.S. electric grid will face unprecedented technological challenges stemming from the growth of distributed and intermittent new energy sources such as solar and wind power, as well as an expected influx of electric and hybrid vehicles that require frequent recharging.

Girl Scouts of the USA Launches Forever Green Project

Girl Scouts of the USA is launching Girl Scouts Forever Green, its signature 100th year anniversary action project focused on waste reduction, energy conservation and rain gardens.

Concrete Supplier Agrees to Pay $740,000 Penalty to Resolve Clean Water Act Violations in Five States

Lafarge North America Inc., one of the largest suppliers of construction materials in the United States and Canada, and four of its U.S. subsidiaries have agreed to resolve alleged Clean Water Act violations.

EPA Reduces Air Pollution In and Around the Port of San Juan, Puerto Rico

The Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico will install pollution-reduction technology on 72 heavy-duty trucks and replace 10 old heavy-duty trucks with 2010 or newer less polluting models.

Free e-News Subscription

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy