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Ground-level Ozone Pollution Helped Recover Normal Ozone Levels Over the Iberian Peninsula

The reconstruction of ozone levels over the Iberian Peninsula between 1979 and 2008 reveals that positive trends began eight years after the ratification of the Montreal Protocol.

Bacteria Convert Wastewater Chemicals into Toxic Form

While traces of pharmaceutical compounds are commonly present in wastewater, interactions with bacteria during the treatment process could transform them from non-toxic to toxic forms, a new study suggests.

Climate Changes Faster than Species Can Adapt

The ranges of species will have to change dramatically as a result of climate change between now and 2100 because the climate will change more than 100 times faster than the rate at which species can adapt, according to a newly published study by Indiana University researchers.

Guidelines Encourage Wineries to Consider Cork Forests When Calculating Carbon Footprint

Winemakers who want to lighten their carbon footprint have yet another reason to seal their wine with natural cork, 100 percent Cork recently announced.

Korean Institute's Successful Transfer of Green Technology

The technology is called "On-line Electric Vehicle (OLEV)," and not too soon, it will be a daily commuting transport in a city in the U.S.

Study Debunks Six Myths About Electricity In The South

Clean energy can help meet growing electricity demand and minimize pollution in the Southern United States, but progress to adopt renewable energy strategies has been hindered by a number of myths, according to a new study by Duke and Georgia Tech researchers.

Study of Wolves will Help Scientists Predict Climate Effects on Endangered Animals

Scientists studying populations of gray wolves in the United States' Yellowstone National Park have developed a way to predict how changes in the environment will impact on the animals' number, body size and genetics, amongst other biological traits.

Wastewater System Generates Energy, Produces Drinking Water

A Michigan State University (MSU) researcher is using a $1.92 million Department of Defense grant to develop a portable wastewater treatment system that could improve the military's efficiency.



EPA and U.S. Department of Energy to Develop Renewable Energy on Previously Contaminated Sites

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory are evaluating the feasibility of developing wind or solar power production on three previously contaminated sites in New York State.

CODE REDD Campaign Aims to Save the World's Threatened Forests

Emergency campaign calls for immediate action from the private sector to reduce their carbon footprint while supporting innovative forest protection projects.

Ecotechnology For International Urban Cities

This alliance is generating a knowledge base on cities and ecotechnology; it will gradually be joined by various Basque and international organisations and companies capable of coming up with innovative solutions underpinned by sustainability criteria for the future development of cities.

Scientists Propose Thinning Sierra Forests to Enhance Water Runoff

Runoff from the Sierra Nevada, a critical source of California’s water supply, could be enhanced by thinning forests to historical conditions, according to a report from a team of scientists with the University of California, Merced, UC Berkeley and the Environmental Defense Fund.

Artificial Leaf Could Debut New Era of "Fast-food Energy"

Technology for making an "artificial leaf" holds the potential for opening an era of "fast-food energy," in which people generate their own electricity at home with low-cost equipment perfect for the three billion people living in developing countries and even home-owners in the United States.

Abrupt Permafrost Thaw Increases Climate Threat

As the Arctic warms, greenhouse gases will be released from thawing permafrost faster and at significantly higher levels than previous estimates, according to survey results from 41 international scientists published in the Nov. 30 issue of the journal Nature.

Collecting Carbon in a Concrete Jungle

Land unsuitable for tree planting could still be used to reduce levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere thanks to new research.

Report Claims Inspection Data on Meat Processing Facilities Could Have "Substantial Benefits"

Publicly posting enforcement and testing data corresponding to specific meat, poultry, and egg products' processing plants on the Internet could have "substantial benefits," including the potential to favorably impact public health, says a new report from the National Research Council.

Affordable Solar Energy - Not Out of Reach

It's time to stop thinking of solar energy as a boutique source of power, says Joshua Pearce.

Climate Change Stunting Growth of Century-old Antarctic Moss Shoots

One hundred years ago, two teams of explorers raced to be the first to reach the South Pole. Roald Engelbregt Gravning Amundsen reached the South Pole on Dec. 14, 1911.

British Butterfly Evolving in Response to Climate Change

As global temperatures rise and climatic zones move polewards, species will need to find different environments to prevent extinction. New research, published today in the journal Molecular Ecology, has revealed that climate change is causing certain species to move and adapt to a range of new habitats.

Oregon Construction Equipment Manufacturer Exceeds Federal Air Pollution Limits, Pays EPA Penalty

Johnson Crushers International, a construction equipment manufacturer based in Eugene, Oregon, released air pollutants into the environment in excess of federal limits, according to a settlement with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and U.S. Department of Justice.

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