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Children At Risk for Ingestion of PAHs from Pavement Sealant

A recent study found that children living near coal-tar-sealed pavement are likely to receive a far higher dose of carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from incidental ingestion of house dust than do children living near unsealed pavement, and that dose is more than two times higher than the PAH dose children are estimated to receive from food.

Gas Mileage of New Vehicles at All-time High

Fuel economy of all new vehicles sold in the United States last month was at its highest mark ever, say researchers at the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute.

EPA 2013 Budget Proposal Focuses on Core Environmental and Human Health Protections

The Obama Administration recently proposed a FY 2013 budget of $8.344 billion for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This budget reflects a government-wide effort to reduce spending and find cost-savings, and is $105 million below the EPA’s enacted level for FY 2012.

Could China's Electric Car Pollution Be More Harmful Than Gasoline Cars?

Electric cars have been heralded as environmentally friendly, but findings from University of Tennessee, Knoxville, researchers show that electric cars in China have an overall impact on pollution that could be more harmful to health than gasoline vehicles.

Research Shows Promise in Converting Camelina Oil into Jet Fuel

Researchers at Montana State University-Northern have developed a process to convert camelina oil to jet fuel and other high-value chemicals. MSU has applied for a U.S. patent and research is ongoing.

Industry Progressing in Voluntary Effort to Reduce Toxic Chemicals

Companies have successfully developed more than150 alternatives to long-chain perfluorinated chemicals.

Environment's Effects on Evolution of Survival Traits

Advances in studying genes mean that scientists in evolutionary developmental biology or “evo-devo” can now explain more clearly than ever before how bats got wings, the turtle got its shell and blind cave fish lost their eyes, says University of Massachusetts Amherst evolutionary biologist Craig Albertson.

Environmentalists Encourage Companies to Pay Up Front for Potential Environmental Disasters

Whether it’s building an oil pipeline, drilling for fuel in the ocean or “fracking” to flush natural gas out of the Earth, we’re often asked to believe the process is safe, when companies want to do something that could have big benefits. But that process also could be potentially disastrous for the environment.



Creating Fuel from Market Waste

Mushy tomatoes, brown bananas and overripe cherries -- to date, waste from wholesale markets has ended up on the compost heap at best. In future it will be put to better use: Researchers have developed a new facility that ferments this waste to make methane, which can be used to power vehicles.

U.K. Research Proposes How to Trim Carbon Footprint

Roofing materials that double as solar panels and can also moderate the temperature of buildings are among the next-generation building products being developed at UNSW.

EPA Orders Louisiana Poultry Farms to Stop Discharging Waste

Two chicken broiler facilities in Louisiana have received notice to stop dumping waste in a neighboring river.

EPA Health Assessment for Popular Dry Cleaning Solvent

In an effort to protect public health, the EPA completed an assessment of the popular dry cleaning solvent - perc. The final assessment determined that perc is a "likely human carcinogen."

Streams Need Trees to Withstand Climate Change

More than twenty years of biological monitoring have confirmed the importance of vegetation for protecting Australia's freshwater streams and rivers against the ravages of drought and climate change.

Plants Don't Get Sunburn

Experts at the University of Glasgow have discovered how plants survive the harmful rays of the sun.

Chemists Harvest Light to Create Green Tool for Pharmaceuticals

A team of University of Arkansas researchers, including an Honors College undergraduate student, have created a new, “green” method for developing medicines.

Electrical Engineers Build No Waste Laser

A team of University of California, San Diego researchers has built the smallest room-temperature nanolaser to date, as well as an even more startling device: a highly efficient, “thresholdless” laser that funnels all its photons into lasing, without any waste.

New Battery Could Lead to Cheaper, Efficient Solar Energy

A joint research project between the University of Southampton and lithium battery technology company REAPsystems has found that a new type of battery has the potential to improve the efficiency and reduce the cost of solar power.

Domestic Consumption Main Contributor to Africa's Growing E-waste

West Africa faces a rising tide of e-waste generated by domestic consumption of new and used electrical and electronic equipment, according to a new United Nations report. Domestic consumption makes up the majority (up to 85 percent) of waste electronic and electrical equipment produced in the region, according to the study.

Feds Approve Calif. Sewage Ban and Create Largest Coastal No Discharge Zone in the Nation

U.S. EPA’s Pacific Southwest Regional Administrator Jared Blumenfeld will sign a rule on Feb. 9, 2012, that will finalize EPA’s decision and approve a state proposal to ban all sewage discharges from large cruise ships and most other large ocean-going ships to state marine waters along California’s 1,624 mile coast from Mexico to Oregon and surrounding major islands. The action establishes a new federal regulation banning even treated sewage from being discharged in California’s marine waters.

Research Suggests Americans Know About Polar Regions, But Don't Care

Americans' knowledge of facts about the polar regions of the globe has increased since 2006, but this increase in knowledge has not translated into more concern about changing polar environments, according to new research from the Carsey Institute at the University of New Hampshire.

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