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Domestic Consumption Main Contributor to Africa's Growing E-waste

West Africa faces a rising tide of e-waste generated by domestic consumption of new and used electrical and electronic equipment, according to a new United Nations report. Domestic consumption makes up the majority (up to 85 percent) of waste electronic and electrical equipment produced in the region, according to the study.

Chemists Harvest Light to Create Green Tool for Pharmaceuticals

A team of University of Arkansas researchers, including an Honors College undergraduate student, have created a new, “green” method for developing medicines.

Feds Approve Calif. Sewage Ban and Create Largest Coastal No Discharge Zone in the Nation

U.S. EPA’s Pacific Southwest Regional Administrator Jared Blumenfeld will sign a rule on Feb. 9, 2012, that will finalize EPA’s decision and approve a state proposal to ban all sewage discharges from large cruise ships and most other large ocean-going ships to state marine waters along California’s 1,624 mile coast from Mexico to Oregon and surrounding major islands. The action establishes a new federal regulation banning even treated sewage from being discharged in California’s marine waters.

Research Suggests Americans Know About Polar Regions, But Don't Care

Americans' knowledge of facts about the polar regions of the globe has increased since 2006, but this increase in knowledge has not translated into more concern about changing polar environments, according to new research from the Carsey Institute at the University of New Hampshire.

New Material Capable of Stopping Carbon Dioxide

Filtering carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas, from factory smokestacks is a necessary, but expensive part of many manufacturing processes. However, a collaborative research team from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the University of Delaware has gathered new insight into the performance of a material called a zeolite that may stop carbon dioxide in its tracks far more efficiently than current scrubbers do.

Bird Populations Near Fukushima are More Diminished than Expected

Low-level radiation in Fukushima Prefecture appears to have had immediate effects on bird populations, and to a greater degree than was expected from a related analysis of Chernobyl, an international team of scientists reported in Environmental Pollution.

Ancient Seagrass Holds Secrets of the Oldest Living Organism on Earth

It's big, it's old and it lives under the sea -- and now an international research collaboration with The University of Western Australia's Ocean's Institute has confirmed that an ancient seagrass holds the secrets of the oldest living organism on Earth.

Report On Texas Fire Urges Firefighters to Consider Wind Effects

Wind conditions at a fire scene can make a critical difference on the behavior of the blaze and the safety of firefighters, even indoors, according to a new report by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).



Study Suggests Growing Up On a Farm Directly Affects Regulation of the Immune System

Immunological diseases, such as eczema and asthma, are on the increase in Western society and represent a major challenge for 21st century medicine.

Carbonized Coffee Grounds Remove Foul Smells

For coffee lovers, the first cup of the morning is one of life's best aromas. But did you know that the leftover grounds could eliminate one of the worst smells around – sewer gas?

Why Common Tree is Toxic to Snowshoe Hares

Boise State University biologists have uncovered why the chemical defenses in birch, a common type of tree found in North America, are toxic to snowshoe hares.

USDA Creates Online Tool for Mapping Water Use and Drought

Farmers and water managers may soon have an online tool to help them assess drought and irrigation impacts on water use and crop development, thanks to the work of two U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists.

How Soil Production Processes Respond to Erosion

In many ways, soil is fundamental to life. Flora and fauna depend on its presence for their survival as much as they depend on water and air. In order to sustain its soil content, an ecosystem needs to maintain a balance between rates of soil erosion and soil production. Factors such as tectonic plate movement or climate change can tip this balance, and learning how such changes affect soil cover is crucial to our understanding of how the Earth’s surface works.

Biosphere Study at the University of Arizona

Scientists are preparing to launch a 10-year project to study water resources, gas exchange and carbon cycling in three man-made landscapes built in a half-acre laboratory at the University of Arizona’s Biosphere 2.

Stanford Geophysicist Says More Environmental Rules Needed for Shale Gas

In his State of the Union address, President Barack Obama praised the potential of the country's tremendous supply of natural gas buried in shale. He echoed the recommendations for safe extraction made by an advisory panel that included Stanford University geophysicist Mark Zoback. The panel made 20 recommendations for regulatory reform, some of which go well beyond what the president mentioned in his address.

Researchers Find Consumers Willing to Buy Sustainable U.S. Cotton

As the interest in environmentally responsible business practices grows globally, researchers are interested in how that interest translates into consumer sales. Researchers from the University of Missouri (MU) have found that United States consumers are more willing to buy clothing made from sustainably grown U.S. cotton than apparel produced using conventional practices in an unknown location.

Engineering Safer Drinking Water in Africa

In the United States and other developed countries, fluoride is often added to drinking water and toothpaste to help strengthen teeth. But too much naturally occurring fluoride can have exactly the opposite effect.

New Model Quantifies Climate Change

Climate change has impacts on forests, fields, rivers -- and thereby on humans that breathe, eat and drink. To assess these impacts more accurately, a comprehensive comparison of computer-based simulations from all over the world will start this week. For the first time, sectors ranging from ecosystems to agriculture to water supplies and health will be scrutinized in a common framework.

New Methodology Assesses Risk of Scarce Metals

Yale researchers have developed a methodology for governments and corporations to determine the availability of critical metals, according to a paper in Environmental Science & Technology.

World's Largest Fuel Cell Can Power 1,400 Homes

Solvay has successfully commissioned its 1-megaWatt industrial demonstration fuel cell at the SolVin plant in Belgium.

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