News


Cleaner Cars Credited for Better L.A. Air, but Pollution is Still the Worst in U.S.

According to a study by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the levels of certain vehicle-related pollutants in Los Angeles have dropped by 98 percent since the 1960s.

Carbon Efficiency Failing to Fight Warming Study

A surge in carbon emissions from power demand in the developing world is overwhelming progress by nations including China and the United States in improving efficiency, new research shows.

U.S. Navy Settles Hazardous Waste Violations at Facility in Virginia Beach, Va.

The U.S. Navy has agreed to pay a $32,800 civil penalty to settle alleged violations of hazardous waste regulations and underground storage tank (UST) regulations at the Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek-Fort Story facility in Virginia Beach, Va. , the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced today.

Robots to Rescue Coral Reefs

A team of 'coralbots', each individually working to simple rules, will piece together damaged bits of coral, allowing them to regrow.

EPA and Baltimore's CNX Marine Terminals Inc. Settle Water and Waste Violations

CNX Marine Terminals, Inc. has agreed to pay a $34,600 penalty to settle alleged violations of federal environmental laws involving the discharge of pollutants in stormwater runoff, the operation and maintenance of underground storage tank systems and waste storage.

Spokane Concrete and Asphalt Manufacturer Fails to Disclose Use of Chemicals

CPM Development Corporation, a concrete and asphalt manufacturing facility, failed to report toxic chemical use at its Spokane, Washington facility under federal community right-to-know laws, according to a settlement with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

A Greener Way to Fertilize Nursery Crops

A U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientist has found a "green" alternative to a type of fertilizer additive that is believed to contribute to the accumulation of heavy metals in waterways.

Half of the Particulate Pollution in North America Comes from Other Continents

Roughly half the aerosols that affect air quality and climate change in North America may be coming from other continents.



Boston Racetrack Fined $1.25 Million for Clean Water Act Violations

Sterling Suffolk Racecourse LLC will pay a civil penalty of $1.25 million to resolve violations of the Clean Water Act (CWA) at its Suffolk Downs racetrack facility in Revere and East Boston, Mass., the U.S. Department of Justice and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have announced.

Link Found Between Cold European Winters and Solar Activity

An international team of researchers show that unusually cold winters in Central Europe are related to low solar activity -- when sunspot numbers are minimal. The freezing of Germany's largest river, the Rhine, is the key.

Past Tropical Climate Change Linked to Ocean Circulation

A new record of past temperature change in the tropical Atlantic Ocean's subsurface provides clues as to why Earth's climate is so sensitive to ocean circulation patterns, according to climate scientists at Texas A&M University.

No-Till Could Help Maintain Crop Yields Despite Climate Change

Reducing tillage for some Central Great Plains crops could help conserve water and reduce losses caused by climate change, according to studies at the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA).

Agulhas Current Is Said to Attenuate the Effect of Melting Ice

Some good news in the world of climate research: the Agulhas Current off the coast of South Africa, is said to stimulate North-South ocean circulation in the Atlantic.

Losing Stream in Our Battle to Predict and Prevent Invasive Species

Invasive species -- plants, animals, and microbes introduced to regions beyond their native range -- carry a global price tag of $1.4 trillion dollars. They are responsible for the loss of natural resources and biodiversity, damages to infrastructure, and an uptick in infectious diseases.

Multiple Factors Including Climate Change Led to Collapse and Depopulation of Ancient Maya

A new analysis of complex interactions between humans and the environment preceding the 9th century collapse and abandonment of the Central Maya Lowlands in the Yucatán Peninsula points to a series of events -- some natural, like climate change; some human-made, including large-scale landscape alterations and shifts in trade routes -- that have lessons for contemporary decision-makers and sustainability scientists.

New Climate History Adds to Understanding of Recent Antarctic Peninsula Warming

Results published this week by a team of polar scientists from Britain, Australia and France adds a new dimension to our understanding of Antarctic Peninsula climate change and the likely causes of the break-up of its ice shelves.

World's Sea Life Is 'Facing Major Shock,' Marine Scientists Warn

Life in the world's oceans faces far greater change and risk of large-scale extinctions than at any previous time in human history, a team of the world's leading marine scientists has warned.

Marine Species at Risk Unless Drastic Protection Policies Put in Place

Many marine species will be harmed or won't survive if the levels of carbon dioxide continue to increase.

Companies to pay $29.8 Million in Cleanup Costs for Big John's Salvage-Hoult Road

In settlement papers filed in federal district court, three companies have agreed to pay about $29.8 million in cleanup costs for a Superfund site in Fairmont, Marion County, W. Va., the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has announced.

Extreme Weather Linked to Global Warming, Nobel Prize-Winning Scientist Says

New scientific analysis strengthens the view that record-breaking summer heat, crop-withering drought and other extreme weather events in recent years do, indeed, result from human activity and global warming, Nobel Laureate Mario J. Molina, Ph.D., said at a conference in Philadelphia on August 20.