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Rena's Chief Officers Plead Guilty, Sentencing May 25

The names of the master and second officer of the container ship that ran aground on New Zealand’s Astrolabe Reef on Oct. 5, 2010, have been suppressed while their case is before the courts. They pleaded guilty to altering the Rena’s documents after it ran aground.

Developing Sustainable Power

The invention of a long-lasting incandescent light bulb in the 19th century spurred on the second wave of the industrial revolution, illuminating homes, extending leisure time and bringing us to the point today where many millions of people use a whole range of devices from mood lighting to audiovisual media centers, microwave ovens to fast-freeze ice makers, and allergy-reducing vacuum cleaners to high-speed broadband connected computers in their homes without a second thought.

Oregon Lumber Mill Cited for Toxic Chemical Leaks and Violations

Sanders Wood Products Company in Liberal, Ore., was found to have a series of PCB leaks and other violations of federal PCB laws at its lumber mill, according to a settlement reached with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The company will pay over $108,000 in penalties.

Sea Level Rise to Alter Economics of California Beaches

Rising sea levels are likely to change Southern California beaches in the coming century, but not in ways you might expect.

Solar Power Grid Installed at Military Base

A Power Purchase Agreement enabled the Edwards Air Force Base to quickly gain solar power without any upfront costs.

EPA Proposes to Keep Greenhouse Gas Permitting Requirements Focused on Largest Emitters

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is proposing not to change the greenhouse gas (GHG) permitting thresholds for the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) and Title V Operating Permit programs.

Obama Administration's Budget Calls for New River Initiative

President Obama and Interior Secretary Ken Salazar launched a new Rivers Initiative, led by the Department of the Interior, to protect and restore rivers across the country.

UC Berkeley Advances Sustainable Chemistry Education with Dow Gift

A Dow gift allows UC Berkeley to renovate and update its green chemistry program.



Sewage Pollution Continues to be a Major Problem in New Jersey

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has approved the 2010 list of waters in New Jersey that are considered either impaired or threatened by pollutants.

Mitsubishi Enhances Electric Vehicle Charging

Mitsubishi partners with AeroVironment to provide more electric vehicle charging opportunities.

New Wall Display Shows Real Time Energy Usage

There's more to the home energy conservation system designed by Queensland University of Technology industrial design graduate Erica Pozzey than meets the eye.

Reduction in U.S. Carbon Emissions Attributed to Cheaper Natural Gas

In 2009, when the United States fell into economic recession, greenhouse gas emissions also fell, by 6.59 percent relative to 2008.

UT Researcher Helps Develop Green Toy Standards

Catherine Wilt, director of the Center for Clean Products at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville’s Institute for a Secure and Sustainable Environment, is working to make toys healthier, safer, and more environmentally friendly.

Federal Officials Announce Nationwide Crackdown on Black Market Rhino Trade

The Department of Justice and the Department of the Interior recently announced the arrest of seven people charged with trafficking endangered black rhinoceros horns.

Monsanto Settles Nitro, W.Va. Agent Orange Cases

A judge granted preliminary approval to a settlement involving activities done 40-60 years ago at the company'’s former plant in the West Virginia city, an industrialized suburb of the state capital, Charleston.

Arctic Sea Ice Decline May Be Driving Snowy Winters Seen in Recent Years

A new study led by the Georgia Institute of Technology provides further evidence of a relationship between melting ice in the Arctic regions and widespread cold outbreaks in the Northern Hemisphere. The study’s findings could be used to improve seasonal forecasting of snow and temperature anomalies across northern continents.

FDA Approves Revising Regulations for BPA

A 60-day public comment period has been opened by the FDA regarding revisions to regulations on BPA. The chemical is no longer used in bottles or sippy cups.

153 Countries Sign Treaty on Ocean Radar Improvements

The Feb. 17 agreement during the World Radiocommunication Conference 2012 (WRC-12) held in Geneva, Switzerland, means better tracking of tsunamis, oil spills, ocean debris and people lost at sea.

Soil Studies Provide Big Benefits

When it comes to studying microbial communities in soil, the smaller the sample, the better. Only by approaching the scale at which microbes interact and function, the micron scale, can scientists understand how the community works. To that end, scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory assayed sub-millimeter-sized soil aggregates to determine biomass and enzyme potential.

Princeton System Tracks Drought to Aid Disaster Relief

Drought is often the precursor to disaster, but getting leads on its stealthy approach through remote or war-torn areas can be so difficult that relief agencies sometimes have little time to react before a bad situation becomes a calamity.

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