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Clean Air Council Says Pennsylvania DEP Failed to Regulate Fracking Pollution, EPA Should Step In

The nonprofit Clean Air Council (CAC) recently asked the U.S. Environmental Protection Administration (EPA) to intervene as a result of the failure of the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection's (PA DEP) to properly regulate fracking and gas processing pollution that contributes to climate change.

Nitrogen from Humans Pollutes Remote Lakes for More Than a Century

Nitrogen derived from human activities has polluted lakes throughout the Northern Hemisphere for more than a century and the fingerprint of these changes is evident even in remote lakes located thousands of miles from the nearest city, industrial area or farm.

Belize Protected Area Boosting Predatory Fish Populations

A 14-year study by the Wildlife Conservation Society in an atoll reef lagoon in Glover's Reef, Belize has found that fishing closures there produce encouraging increases in populations of predatory fish species. However, such closures have resulted in only minimal increases in herbivorous fish, which feed on the algae that smother corals and inhibit reef recovery.

New Plastics Recycling Website for Recycling Professionals

Numerous organizations dedicated to increasing plastics recycling have launched a new website (www.RecycleYourPlastics.org) to aggregate the extensive but often far-flung information on plastics recycling that exists on the Internet.

Future is Bright for ONR's Lightweight Sun-powered Generator

The Department of the Navy continues its move toward renewable energy with an Office of Naval Research (ONR)-funded solar generator that recently entered full production, with several systems already in the field.

Wildlife Researchers Want Your Old Socks

A University of California wildlife research team working in the Sierra Nevada is asking the public to donate clean, gently used socks for research on a rare weasel called the Pacific fisher.

Economic Outlook for U.S. Chemistry Industry Mixed; Shale Gas Offers Bright Spot

Despite a slowdown in America’s economic recovery, the outlook for the U.S. chemicals manufacturing industry is more encouraging. According to the American Chemistry Council’s (ACC) 2011 Year-End Situation and Outlook recently published, gradual improvement will occur in 2012, before a stronger recovery takes hold in 2013.

Walmart Pulls Powdered Infant Formula from Stores after Boy's Death

After the death of a newborn Missouri boy who consumed Enfamil Newborn powdered infant formula, Walmart pulled the product from more than 3,000 of its stores nationwide.



NREL Releases Report on Testing Electric Vehicles to Optimize their Performance with Power Grids

Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have released a technical report that could help improve the performance of electric vehicles (EVs) and the efficiency of the electric utility grids that power them.

U.S.-Canada Arctic Ocean Survey Partnership Saved Costs Increased Data

A recent mission marked the completion of a five-year collaboration between the United States and Canada to survey the Arctic Ocean. The bilateral project collected scientific data to delineate the continental shelf beyond 200 nautical miles from the coastline, also known as the extended continental shelf (ECS).

American Chemistry Council Expresses Concern with Safe Chemicals Act

In testimony before a joint legislative hearing of the full Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works and the Subcommittee on Superfund, Toxics and Environmental Health, American Chemistry Council (ACC) President and CEO Cal Dooley expressed the Council’s concerns with S. 847, the “Safe Chemicals Act,” and reiterated a desire to continue to work with Congress to update the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA).

IEA Says Action Needed To Sustainably Enhance Energy Security and Avert Climate Change

International Energy Agency Executive Director Maria van der Hoeven recently called on countries to step up efforts to avert climate change, noting that to do so requires addressing their energy security concerns in a sustainable manner.

Will Antarctic Worms Warm to Changing Climate?

Researchers at the University of Delaware (UD) are examining tiny worms that inhabit the frigid sea off Antarctica to learn not only how these organisms adapt to the severe cold, but how they will survive as ocean temperatures increase.

Proposals for Reducing Carbon Dioxide Emissions Must Balance with Development Needs

Efforts to combat climate change should take into account the development levels of different countries when negotiating agreements, according to a study published in the online journal PLoS ONE.

USDA Announces Funding to Convert Biomass to Energy

Deputy Agriculture Undersecretary for Rural Development Doug O'Brien recently announced that USDA is funding a series of projects to convert biomass to energy through USDA's Rural Energy for America program. (REAP).

NREL Licenses Technology to Increase Solar Cell Efficiency

The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently announced that Natcore Technology Inc. has been granted a patent license agreement to develop a line of black silicon products.

American Chemistry Council's Tips for A Green Holiday Season

Move over, white Christmas, and make way for a "green" holiday. Here are a few tips that can make your holidays more environmentally friendly, courtesy of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world's largest scientific society, and the ACS Green Chemistry Institute.

New EPA Air Quality Rules Outweigh Costs and Provide Major Health and Environmental Benefits

A report by researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health provides an expanded review of six new air quality regulations proposed or recently adopted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA).

Iowa State Engineers Study How Hills Nearby Turbines Affect Wind Energy Production

Iowa State engineers are using wind tunnel tests to study the effects of hilly terrain and turbine placement on power production.

Coal Waste Could Provide Eco-friendly Option to Cement

Concrete is the most common construction material used globally, accounting for 70 percent of all construction materials. Though concrete has advantages such as easy application and high availability, it has major disadvantages when considering sustainability.

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