Senate Hearing Looks at Shark Research

"Sharks and the scientists who study them have led us to improvements in aerodynamics, renewable energy, electrical sensors, and health and medical research. Innovative shark research can benefit marine ecosystems and continue to raise public awareness about these important species," said committee Chairman John Thune, R-S.D.

The U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation will hold a hearing July 18 to examine innovations in shark research techniques and technology. This research improves Americans' lives by increasing our understanding of oceans and fisheries, creating new innovations in engineering, and searching for medical breakthroughs, said U.S. Sen. John Thune, R-S.D., chairman of the committee.

"Sharks and the scientists who study them have led us to improvements in aerodynamics, renewable energy, electrical sensors, and health and medical research. Innovative shark research can benefit marine ecosystems and continue to raise public awareness about these important species," said Thune. "That said, we don't see many in South Dakota."

Witnesses scheduled to testify are:

  • Dr. Al Dove, vice president, Research and Conservation, Georgia Aquarium
  • Dr. Robert Hueter, senior scientist and director of the Center for Shark Research, Mote Marine Laboratory
  • Amy Kukulya, principal investigator and senior AUV operations engineer, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
  • Dr. Cheryl Wilga, professor and director of the Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alaska Anchorage

Scheduled to start at 10 a.m., the hearing will take place in Russell Senate Office Building, Room 253. Witness testimony, opening statements, and a live video of the hearing will be available on www.commerce.senate.gov.

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