Ancient Snow Patches in Norway are Melting

Researchers from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology have discovered that snow patches that have been in Norway for more than 5,000 years are beginning to melt at a rapid pace due to climate change.

Researchers from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology have discovered that snow patches that have been in Norway for more than 5,000 years are beginning to melt at a rapid pace due to climate change. Some of the patches are even beginning to move, making them more of a glacier than a snow patch.

Researchers from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology have discovered that snow patches that have been in Norway for more than 5,000 years are beginning to melt at a rapid pace due to climate change. Some of the patches are even beginning to move, making them more of a glacier than a snow patch.

The researchers, who’ve been studying the area since 2012, worry that the snow patches will disappear completely if there are one or two more hot summers.

"Norway has a long tradition of taking measurements of glaciers of varying size, but we know very little about the smallest glaciers and what the locals refer to as snow patches," says Associate Professor Geir Vatne of NTNU's Department of Geography.

Using GPS technology to measure movement or melt in the snow patches, the scientists are able to retrieve accurate data and even take sediment samples of the areas with the most change.

"It's highly likely that snow patches will soon melt away," Vatne said. "Perhaps for good."

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