Environmental Protection

Ecosystems


Natural Levels of Nitrogen in Tropical Forests May Increase Vulnerability to Pollution

Waterways in remote, pristine tropical forests located in the Caribbean and Central America contain levels of nitrogen comparable to amounts found in streams and rivers flowing through polluted forests in the United States and Europe. This discovery by a Princeton University-led research team raises questions about how tropical forests might respond if they were to become exposed to additional nitrogen through water and air pollution.

Overfishing Threatens the Survival of Seabirds

From gannets to seagulls, puffins to penguins, all seabirds suffer the same drop in birth rates when the supply of fish drops to less than a third of maximum capacity. That's the result from an international study on the relationships between predators and prey in seven ecosystems around the world, published in the magazine Science and coordinated by Philippe Cury, an IRD researcher.

Chemists Study Mutated Plants, Possibly Better for Biofuels

Genetic mutations to cellulose in plants could improve the conversion of cellulosic biomass into biofuels, according to a research team that included two Iowa State University chemists.

Sea Level Rise to Alter Economics of California Beaches

Rising sea levels are likely to change Southern California beaches in the coming century, but not in ways you might expect.

Sewage Pollution Continues to be a Major Problem in New Jersey

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has approved the 2010 list of waters in New Jersey that are considered either impaired or threatened by pollutants.

Federal Officials Announce Nationwide Crackdown on Black Market Rhino Trade

The Department of Justice and the Department of the Interior recently announced the arrest of seven people charged with trafficking endangered black rhinoceros horns.

Princeton System Tracks Drought to Aid Disaster Relief

Drought is often the precursor to disaster, but getting leads on its stealthy approach through remote or war-torn areas can be so difficult that relief agencies sometimes have little time to react before a bad situation becomes a calamity.

Study Suggests Nation's Urban Forests Losing Ground

National results indicate that tree cover in urban areas of the United States is declining at a rate of about four million trees per year, according to a U.S. Forest Service study published recently in Urban Forestry & Urban Greening.



Biosphere Study at the University of Arizona

Scientists are preparing to launch a 10-year project to study water resources, gas exchange and carbon cycling in three man-made landscapes built in a half-acre laboratory at the University of Arizona’s Biosphere 2.

Burmese Pythons Reason for Mammal Habitat Decline in Everglades

Precipitous declines in formerly common mammals in Everglades National Park have been linked to the presence of invasive Burmese pythons, according to a study published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Ancient DNA Holds Clues to Climate Change Adaptation

Thirty-thousand-year-old bison bones discovered in permafrost at a Canadian goldmine are helping scientists unravel the mystery about how animals adapt to rapid environmental change.

How Seawater Could Corrode Nuclear Fuel

Japan used seawater to cool nuclear fuel at the stricken Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear plant after the tsunami in March 2011 -- and that was probably the best action to take at the time, says Professor Alexandra Navrotsky of the University of California, Davis.

Potato Company Pays EPA Penalty for Failing to Report Ammonia Release

Oregon Potato Company failed to report an anhydrous ammonia release at their facility in Warden, Wash., and will pay the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) a $66,235 penalty.

Broadcast Study of Ocean Acidification to Date Helps Scientists Evaluate Effects on Marine Life

Might a penguin's next meal be affected by the exhaust from your tailpipe? The answer may be yes, when you add your exhaust fumes to the total amount of carbon dioxide lofted into the atmosphere by humans since the industrial revolution. One-third of that carbon dioxide is absorbed by the world's oceans, making them more acidic and affecting marine life.

Diverse Ecosystems are Crucial Climate Change Buffer

Preserving diverse plant life will be crucial to buffer the negative effects of climate change and desertification in in the world's drylands, according to a new landmark study.

Triad Mining Agrees to Resolve Clean Water Act Violations and Restore Affected Waterways in Indiana

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) announced that Triad Mining Inc., the owner and operator of 31 surface mines in Appalachia and Indiana, has agreed to pay a penalty and restore affected waterways for failing to obtain the required Clean Water Act (CWA) permit for stream impacts caused by its surface mining operation in Indiana

Satellite Tracking Helps Russian Tanker Navigate Critical Sea Duck Habitat

On its way to deliver emergency fuel to Nome, Alaska, the Russian tanker Renda will move through an area used by wintering spectacled eiders, a federally threatened sea duck

Another Outbreak of Coral Disease Hits Reefs of Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii

The disease called acute Montipora White Syndrome (MWS) has reappeared and is again killing corals in Kaneohe Bay, Oʻahu.

What The Mining Debate is Missing

As mining is resurging in North America, debates across the continent over mines are simplified: “Do we prioritize jobs or the environment? Companies or communities?” These are worthy debates. Yet should the issue of mining really be reduced to “pro-con” statements?

Salt Water Alone Unlikely to Halt Burmese Python Invasion

Invasive Burmese python hatchlings from the Florida Everglades can withstand exposure to salt water long enough to potentially expand their range through ocean and estuarine environments, according to research in the latest issue of the Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology.

Free e-News Subscription

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy