Environmental Protection

Research and Technology


Study Reveals Nature and Humans Quite Similar

World financial markets may be reeling from new setbacks, but it turns out there’s a secret economy right under our noses and it’s thriving. The movers and shakers, however, are plants and fungi.

EPA Seeks Input on the Development of Drinking Water Perchlorate Regulation

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is inviting small businesses, governments, and not-for-profit organizations to participate as small entity representatives (SERs) for a small business advocacy review (SBAR) panel.

Reversing E. Coli's Metabolism Produces Biofuels, Chemicals at Rapid Clip

Rice University engineering researchers unveiled a new method for rapidly converting simple glucose into biofuels and petrochemical substitutes

Map Identifies Important Coral Reefs Exposed to Stress

The study, say the authors, will help to conserve some of the world’s most important coral reefs by identifying reef systems where biodiversity is high and stress is low, ecosystems where management has the best chance of success.

Study: Late-’90s Arctic Ice Melt Caused Half by GHGs, Half by Normal Climate Conditions

These findings point to climate change and variability working together equally to accelerate the observed sea ice loss during the late 20th century.

Novel Technology Allows LCDs to Recycle Energy

We've all worried about the charge on our smartphone or laptop running down when we have no access to an electrical outlet. But new technology developed by researchers at the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science could finally help solve the problem.

Most Plant Species Important in Various and Varying Ecosystems

There are many different types of plants in grasslands around the world. According to a new analysis of plants in grassland ecosystems around the world, it turns out that most of those plant species are important.

Scientists Discover New Eruption at Undersea Volcano

A team of scientists just discovered a new eruption of Axial Seamount, an undersea volcano located about 250 miles off the Oregon coast – and one of the most active and intensely studied seamounts in the world.

Hybrid System Uses Solar Heat to Make Rooftop Hydrogen

While roofs across the world sport photovoltaic solar panels to convert sunlight into electricity, a Duke University engineer believes a novel hybrid system can wring even more useful energy out of the sun's rays.

Is Hunting Wolves Key to Their Conservation?

Hunters have been credited with being strong conservation advocates for numerous game species in multiple countries. Would initiating a wolf hunt invoke the same advocacy for the carnivores?

lettuce

Early Suntan Helps Lettuce Crops Bulk Up

New Zealand’s intense ultraviolet light may be bad for the skin, but it could provide a boost for vegetable production, according to new research by a Massey University crop scientist.

Report: 'Super Green' More Likely to be Wealthy

Many do not equate the environmentally focused activities of composting, recycling and using rechargeable batteries as primary activities of the high-income American jet set. But, according to a new report from Scarborough Research, the "Super Green" – those consumers who engage in the highest amount of environmentally-friendly activities as measured by Scarborough – are top earners with a taste for luxury.

Geologist Experiments With Crowdsourcing to Track Water Levels of Local Streams

Inspired by a California researcher who used crowdsourcing to pinpoint the locations of roadkill, a University at Buffalo geologist is turning to the public for help monitoring a different ecological phenomenon: The water levels of streams in Western New York.

New Research Sheds Light on South Pole Dinosaurs

Dog-sized dinosaurs that lived near the South Pole, sometimes in the dark for months at a time, had bone tissue very similar to dinosaurs that lived everywhere on the planet, according to a doctoral candidate at Montana State University (MSU).

Research Evaluates Emissions-Reduction Scenario

New computer modeling work shows that by 2100, if society wants to limit carbon dioxide in the atmosphere to less than 40 percent higher than it is today, the lowest cost option is to use every available means of reducing emissions.

CO2-Caused Ocean Acidification Will Reduce Mollusk Harvests

Changes in ocean chemistry due to increased carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions are expected to damage shellfish populations around the world, but some nations will feel the impacts much sooner and more intensely than others, according to a study by scientists at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI, USA).

Crop Breeding Could Reduce CO2 Levels

Writing in the journal Annals of Botany, Professor Douglas Kell argues that developing crops that produce roots more deeply in the ground could harvest more carbon from the air, and make crops more drought resistant, while dramatically reducing carbon levels.

Tiny, Symbiotic Fungi May Hold the Key to Adapting Plants to Climate Change

Rice – which provides nearly half the daily calories for the world’s population – could become adapted to climate change and some catastrophic events by colonizing its seeds or plants with the spores of tiny naturally occurring fungi, U.S. Geological Survey-led research shows.

Michigan Researchers See Plentiful Lithium Resources for Electric Vehicles

Researchers from the University of Michigan and Ford Motor Co. have assessed the global availability of lithium and compared it to the potential demand from large-scale global use of electric vehicles.

LED Bulb Wins Energy Departments L Prize Competition

The Department of Energy's L Prize challenged the lighting industry to develop high-performance, energy-saving replacements for conventional light bulbs that will save American consumers and businesses money.

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