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Public Meeting to be Held for Protecting Pollinators

The Office of Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention and the U.S. Department of Agriculture will be having a public meeting for those engaged in activities to reduce exposure of honey bees and other pollinators to pesticides.

Comment Period Extended for Genetically Engineered Salmon

The FDA has extended the comment period for two draft environmental review documents on the proposed conditions of a new animal drug application (NADA) concerning genetically engineered Atlantic salmon.

GOJO Sustainability Report Wins National Recognition

"We are fortunate to be in a business where we can make a real difference in social sustainability -– saving lives and making life better for people through the types of products and programs we provide," said Marcella Kanfer Rolnick, GOJO's vice chair.

Xcel Energy Hit Wind Milestones in 2012

And the company's Colorado operations set a one-hour record for wind on its system Jan. 16, 2013, when overall demand for electricity was met by 1,960 megawatts of wind power.

Canada Finalizes Plan to Study Wind Turbines' Health Impacts

Health Canada and Statistics Canada are collaborating on the study and expect to complete it in 2014. Initially they'll survey adult inhabitants in 2,000 residences near up to a dozen turbines.

Captain Sues Coast Guard to get License Back after Causing Oil Spill

A California captain is suing the Coast Guard to get his license back after causing San Francisco Bay's worst spill oil since 1988.

State Agencies' Responsibilities Expanding

Seventeen states have joined the new Association of Air Pollution Control Agencies, which will create a technical forum to help states apply the Clean Air Act and associated regulations.

Toxic Algae Growth Created by Ocean Nitrogen

According to a new study in the Journal of Phycology, ocean nitrogen caused by pollution and natural sources sparks the growth of toxic phytoplankton species, which is very harmful to marine life and human health.



Quantum Dots Can Assemble Themselves

NREL scientists and other researchers demonstrated a process where quantum dots can self-assemble at optimal locations in nanowires, a breakthrough that could vastly improve solar cells, lighting devices, and quantum computing.

Nonfuel Mineral Production Increases Again

The USGS has announced that nonfuel mineral production values in the U.S. have increased for the third consecutive year, noting a $1.7 billion raise since 2011.

Ice Core Recovered from West Antarctica

Scientists from the South Dakota University made history this year by retrieving additional ice from the main borehole as part of the West Antarctica Ice Sheet Divide Ice Core project.

More Protection for Participants in Human Studies Involving Pesticides

EPA Administrator Lisa P. Jackson has signed amendments that strengthen existing standards for human research involving pesticides submitted by third parties for consideration in EPA decision-making. These amendments will apply to studies involving the controlled exposure of participants to pesticides.

Second Term Agenda: Addressing Climate Change, Creating Green Jobs

President Obama's message was clear in his second inaugural address, and he reiterated it when Energy Secretary Dr. Steven Chu announced he will step down soon.

Online Training Helps Electronics Firms Reduce Costs, Toxicity, Waste, and Energy Output

To help minimize the amount of e-waste caused by electronics firms, TFI has developed a new training program that teaches electronics industry personnel how to reduce environmental impacts.

BP Government Contracts Doubled Since Gulf Spill

Following the worst oil spill in U.S. history, some question the acceleration of government contracts granted to BP prior to suspension.

Nearly $18 Million Awarded in Recycling Program Grants in Pennsylvania

The DEP has awarded $17.8 million in recycling grants to 131 municipalities and counties for developing and implementing recycling programs.

NAS Elects New VP and Councilors

A new vice president and four new councilors have been elected to the National Academy of Science (NAS) governing Council. Their terms will officially begin on July 1, 2013.

Study of Soil Microbes Could Minimize the Effects of Erosion

The ARS is conducting a new study to discover how microbes in the soil that are carried off by strong winds could lead to finding ways to minimize soil damage that is caused by wind erosion.

Veolia Energy Joins University of Pennsylvania’s Climate Action Plan

Veolia Energy recently held a ribbon-cutting ceremony to commission the two new, natural gas-fired rapid-response boilers, which is part of the company’s multi-million dollar investment in its Philadelphia district energy network to convert it to 100 percent ‘Green Steam’.

Millions Awarded in Water and Wastewater Grants in Tennessee

Four communities in Tennessee have received more than $15 million in low-interest loans for water and wastewater infrastructure improvements.

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