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Explore the Pursuit of the Power Grid

In the pursuit of the power grid’s evolution, industry researchers are hard at work developing and implementing new “smart grid” innovations to solve today’s greatest power challenges.

Manatees and Pelicans Dying in Indian River Lagoon

At the Indian River Lagoon in Florida, several manatees and pelicans have been found dead, most likely due to the algae blooms that are quickly invading the area. With the deaths of these animals, scientists fear this is the beginning of a devastating ecosystem collapse.

It’s the 20th Annual World Water Day

Several organizations and companies, such as American Water Works Association and GE, are recognizing Water World Day, which highlights the critical role that water plays in the everyday lives of people and animals around the world.

Registration Open for Adopt-A-Highway in West Virginia

The West Virginia DEP is accepting applications from now until April 12 for the Saturday, April 27 Adopt-A-Highway Spring Statewide Cleanup.

Switchgrass for Home Heating

USDA scientists have been studying the use of switchgrass pellets for heating purposes. According to their research, the pellets could potentially become a cheaper energy source to replace fuel oil used to heat homes and businesses in the Northeast.

Health Studies to Follow Latest Camp Lejeune Drinking Water Report

The ATSDR report says drinking water distributed by the Hadnot Point treatment plant contained excessive amounts of five VOCs from August 1953 through January 1985.

More Than 930 Million Pounds of Rigid Plastics Recycled Each Year

In 2011, 934 million pounds of rigid plastics, which does not include plastic bottles, was recycled. That number is expected to be higher for 2012, especially since local access to recycling centers increased from 40 percent to 57 percent between the last two years.

New Water Testing Could Prevent Beach Closures

A new study by the USGS involves a rapid water-quality test that provides accurate same day results of bacteria levels, which could help prevent beaches from being closed.



A Significant Drop in Energy Use and Intensity for Manufacturing Sector

According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the total energy consumption in the manufacturing industry has decreased by 17 percent since 2002. Energy output for manufacturing decreased by 3 percent in the same amount of time.

Weather and Climate Predictions are Worth Their Weight in Gold

The economic costs of damaging weather events have an immense and increasing impact on the U.S. economy, and these costs could be anticipated and mitigated by improved weather and climate predictions, say a range of experts in the public and private sectors. These experts will convene in Washington, D.C. from April 2-4 and discuss best strategies to minimize the weather and climate’s hit on people and the economy.

It’s Annual Fix a Leak Week

March 18-24 is annual Fix a Leak Week, and the EPA is encouraging Americans to replace leaky plumbing fixtures and sprinkler systems as a way to help households save more than 10,000 gallons of wasted water per year. According to the EPA, one in 10 homes has some sort of water leak that results in 90 wasted gallons of water each day.

Aiming to Develop Environmentally Friendly Electronic Devices

Researchers at the UPNA (Public University of Navarre) are leading the ENEIDA project, which is trying to tackle the technological changes needed to create more energy-efficient and more environmentally-friendly electronic devices.

Further Improvements Needed on Chemical Security Regulations

Although the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has made great progress in chemical security with the Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards (CFATS) program, there is still plenty of room for improvement, according to Timothy J. Scott, Chief Security Officer and Corporate Director Emergency Services and Security at The Dow Chemical Company.

Joint Efforts to Clean Up an Illegal Dump

Both public and private partners have been working together this week to help clean up an illegal dump in Ohio. It’s been estimated that 14,000 tons will be removed from the former construction site that has been covered with waste that stretches 20 feet high and covers about an acre of land.

Mediterranean Coastline is Tough to Preserve Because of Uncontrolled Development

Representatives of Mediterranean countries, participating in Mare Nostrum's opening event, emphasized the need to bridge the differences between countries and municipal authorities on how to implement ICZM principles.

Argentina Produces Two Marine Protected Areas

Two coastal have been created in Patagonia, Argentina to help safeguard sea lions, penguins, dolphins, and other sea life.

U.S. Cities with Most Energy Star Buildings

A list of U.S. metropolitan areas with the most Energy Star certified buildings in 2012 has been released by the EPA. Atlanta, Chicago, Los Angeles, New York, and Washington, D.C. ranked in the top five.

Biomass Research Collaboration to Improve Biofuel Efficiency

A biochemical engineer at the Kansas State University is part of a national collaboration that is working to advance biomass as a leading source for more efficient bio-power, drop-in biofuels, and animal feed.

The Fukushima Nuclear Disaster: Two Years Later

It’s been two years since the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster that happened as a result of the Tohoku earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011. Since that time, biologist Tim Mousseau of the University of South Carolina’s College of Arts and Sciences discusses some of the consequences the area faces as a result of the radiation exposure.

Removal of 65 Dams to Restore Rivers in 2012

In 2012, more than 400 miles of streams were restored for the benefit of fish, wildlife, and people across the country. This restoration was completed by communities, non-profit organizations, and state and federal agencies in 19 states.

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