Environmental Protection

Today, the EPA has released a proposal that will place tough emissions limits on coal-fired power plants, which is expected to cut carbon emissions by 30 percent.

EPA Limits Coal-Fired Power Plants to Reduce Carbon Emissions

Today, the EPA has released a proposal that will place tough emissions limits on coal-fired power plants, which is expected to cut carbon emissions by 30 percent.

As a way to help reduce America’s carbon dioxide emissions by 30 percent, the EPA has released a rule proposal that limits emissions of power plants that operate by using coal. This rule may also lead to the expansion of natural gas for power generation for the plants. States have until June 30, 2016 to make a plan on implementing this rule and to decide the best way to cut the average carbon emissions per megawatt-hour.

"Climate change, fueled by carbon pollution, supercharges risks to our health, our economy, and our way of life. EPA is delivering on a vital piece of President Obama's Climate Action Plan by proposing a Clean Power Plan that will cut harmful carbon pollution from our largest source--power plants," said EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy. "By leveraging cleaner energy sources and cutting energy waste, this plan will clean the air we breathe while helping slow climate change so we can leave a safe and healthy future for our kids. We don't have to choose between a healthy economy and a healthy environment--our action will sharpen America’s competitive edge, spur innovation, and create jobs." 

Although implementation of the plan could be costly, around $8 billion a year, the EPA estimates that the plan would save 6,600 lives and more than $50 billion a year in healthcare costs related to air pollution.

To read more about the proposed rule, please click here.

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