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EPA Considering New Toxicity Testing for BPA

Following a BPA Action Plan announced in March 2010, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is requesting public comment on possible toxicity testing and environmental sampling to study BPA’s potential environmental impacts.

Concrete Presents Solid, Eco-Friendly Option in Home-Décor

Concrete can serve a multitude of uses in decorating the home, from artful flooring to sturdy countertops. It is also remarkably eco-friendly. It uses byproducts from other industries in its creation and is largely recyclable when you're done with it.

UIC Biologists Poll Pollinators for Urban Agriculture

"Eat locally, grow locally" has become a mantra of today's move to a more sustainable lifestyle. But growing fruits and vegetables in your own neighborhood often depends on some helping hands -- or legs and wings -- from an army of insect pollinators, notably bees.

Veterans Medical Center to Pay Civil Penalty to Settle Hazardous Waste Issues

The Robert J. Dole Veterans Administration Medical Center in Wichita, Kan., has agreed to pay a $17,979 civil penalty to the United States to settle a series of hazardous waste violations on its campus.

Novel Gene Could Hold Key to Increasing Biofuel Production Efficiency

If researchers can coax yeast into processing more of the sugars found in biofuel feedstocks, they can improve the efficiency of producing renewable fuels from biomass crops like corn stover or switchgrass.

Detroit Metro Airport Installing Electric Vehicle Charging Stations

DTE Energy, a Detroit-based diversified energy company involved in the development and management of energy-related businesses and services nationwide, recently announced that it will install four Plug-in Electric Vehicle charging stations at Detroit Metro Airport – part of a program to deploy 16 such public charging stations throughout Southeastern Michigan.

How 12 U.S. Cities are Dealing with Water-related Climate Change

As the nation grapples with a record year for storms, drought and weather-related devastation, a new report claims climate change is leaving American cities open to a range of water-related vulnerabilities –- from drought to sea level rise and increased rainfall –- regardless of region or size. The report looks at how communities facing these new extremes are trying to protect their water supplies and waterways.

Study: Stocks of Tuna, Other Fish Threatened with Extinction

A new study by top global fisheries experts presents an alarming assessment of several economically important fish populations. The analysis of 61 species of "scombrids," which include tunas, bonitos, mackerels and Spanish mackerels, and billfishes, which include swordfish and marlins, classified seven as threatened with extinction and four as "near threatened" for the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.



Advances in Lithium-Oxygen Batteries Could Hold More Energy in Less Space

MIT researchers have found a way to improve the energy density of a type of battery known as lithium-air (or lithium-oxygen) batteries, producing a device that could potentially pack several times more energy per pound than the lithium-ion batteries that now dominate the market for rechargeable devices in everything from cellphones to cars.

Climate Change to Potentially Increase Yellowstone Wildfires

An increase in wildfires due to climate change could rapidly and profoundly alter the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, according to a new study authored by environmental engineering and geography Professor Anthony Westerling of the University of California, Merced.

Mexico City Reduces GHG Emissions by 5.7 Million Metric Tonnes

Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions have been reduced by an accumulated 5.7 million metric tonnes (mt) in Mexico City since it began implementing its Green Plan in 2008, the Mexico City government recently announced.

Researchers Float Framework for Relocating Species Threatened by Climate Change

In a paper published in the journal Nature Climate Change, researchers from CSIRO, University of Queensland and United States Geological Survey present a pragmatic decision framework for determining when, if ever, to move species in the face of climate change.

Parasites Help Revise Ecological Theory

An old theory in ecology is that in any ecosystem, a small-sized animal species will be more populous than a large species. All you need is a summer picnic to prove the point: your barbecue might end up attracting thousands of tiny ants — but only a few rotund squirrels.

Study: Increase in Aerosols Has Offset Some Recent Climate Warming

A recent increase in the abundance of particles high in the atmosphere has offset about a third of the current climate warming influence of carbon dioxide (CO2) change during the past decade, according to a new study led by NOAA and published today in the online edition of Science.

How Dairy Farms Contribute to Greenhouse Gas Emissions

U.S. Department of Agriculture scientists have produced the first detailed data on how large-scale dairy facilities contribute to the emission of greenhouse gases.

University of Texas Faculty Bring Science, Policy to Hydraulic Fracturing Debate

Experts at The University of Texas at Austin and the Cockrell School of Engineering are helping to improve the safety and efficiency of hydraulic fracturing, identify issues that need to be corrected and untangle the knowns and unknowns of a process that is expected to constitute perhaps half of the nation's total natural gas supplies in coming years.

Jersey City, N.J., to Upgrade, Repair Sewer System to Resolve Clean Water Act Violations

A settlement between the United States and the Jersey City, N.J., Municipal Utilities Authority will resolve Clean Water Act violations by JCMUA for failing to properly operate and maintain its combined sewer system, the Department of Justice and the EPA.

Examining the Safety of Next-generation Nuclear Reactors

Scientists from The University of Manchester have been selected to undertake vital safety work on the next generation of the world’s nuclear reactors.

The Plan to End the Use of Environmentally Harmful Chemicals on Commercial Crops

Two University of Alberta researchers have published a step-by-step plan to one day end the use of environmentally harmful chemicals on commercial crops by developing plants that produce their own fertilizer.

Forecasting Tool for Future Resources

Understanding how energy can be used efficiently is key to reducing carbon emissions and mitigating future fuel and food shortages. But energy use is only part of the story. The link between resources and final services – such as food, warmth, shelter and transport – is only really complete if water and land use is also factored in.

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