Study: Phosphorus Important to Soil Management

A group of scientists in the United States and Australia have identified the chemical forms of phosphorus, using 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, in soils receiving organic byproducts for at least eight years (treated) as compared with soils not receiving phosphorus application (untreated).

Results from the study were published in the January-February issue of the Soil Science Society of America Journal.

Regardless of the type of organic materials applied (dairy, swine, poultry, or spent mushroom compost), orthophosphate (inorganic P) was the single dominant P form, more so in treated soils (79-93 percent of total phosphorus) than in untreated soils (33-71 percent). Orthophosphate also was the only P form that differed dramatically between paired soils, three to five times greater in treated than untreated soils. Other P forms included condensed inorganic P and various organically bound P groups; however, their amounts were relatively small and differences between each paired soils were insignificant.

Surprisingly, the study revealed no evidence of phytate-P accumulation in any of the soils receiving organic wastes. Phytate is an organic storage form of P that is known to be present in animal manures, in particularly large proportion (up to 80 percent of total P) in poultry manure. Phytate-P is generally considered to be recalcitrant in the agroecosystem because of its chemical structure. However, the lack of phytate-P accumulation in several soils receiving poultry manure in this study indicates that manure-derived phytate-P may not be biologically and environmentally benign.

Zhengxia Dou, the lead author, stated "in terms of potential P loss in the long run, organic materials containing large amounts of phytate-P such as poultry manure may not differ from other material containing mainly inorganic P". Andrew Sharpley, a collaborating scientist, further explained "when the soils' P sorption capacity was nearly saturated after years of manure application, phytate or other organic P forms could be exposed to breakdown and potential loss." Therefore, it is important to strive toward balancing P inputs with outputs and to prevent P from building up in soils to which manure is applied.

Go to http://soil.scijournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/73/1/93 to view the abstract of the article.

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