Environmental Protection

Endangered Species


Discovery of Disease-Resistant Oysters Brings Call for Shift in Preservation Strategies

Development of disease resistance among Chesapeake Bay oysters calls for a shift in oyster-restoration strategies within the Bay and its tributaries.

Wildlife Surviving Ongoing Conflict in Afghanistan

A new survey conducted by WCS scientists, supported by the U.S. Agency for International Development, reveals that large mammals, including Asiatic black bears, gray wolves, markhor goats, and leopard cats, are surviving in parts of Afghanistan after years of conflict.

Honduran President Lobo Sosa Announces Shark Sanctuary

The designation encompasses the 92,665 square miles of the country's exclusive economic zone on its Pacific and Caribbean coasts.

Native Bees, Essential to Plant Pollination, Are Picky About Where They Live: Study

The study found that, overall, composition of a plant community is a weak predictor of the composition of a bee community, which may seem counterintuitive at first, said USGS scientist and study lead Ralph Grundel

Research Tackles Effects of Dredging on Fish and River Habitats

Melinda Daniels, associate professor of geography, and Keith Gido, associate professor of biology, are collaborating on a project that involves habitat and fish sampling on the Kansas River, which stretches across northeast Kansas.

Athletes Scale Peaks, Swim Seas to Raise Funds for Clean Oceans, Water

Mitigating damage from environmental problems is a daunting task, especially considering the scope of the project. Despite the great size of the problems facing the environment, the sheer size of these issues can leave those in a position to do a little something about it feeling paralyzed. But for those used to taking on the Earth’s biggest challenges – literally oceans and mountains – pursuing relief after such disasters is all in a day’s work.

Endangered Barred Owls Perhaps More Abundant Than Previously Thought

Barred owls may be more abundant in coniferous forests of the Pacific Northwest than previously recognized, according to research published in the Journal of Wildlife Management.

Scientists Can Track Origin of Shark Fins Using DNA Zip Coding

An international team of scientists has used DNA to determine that groups of dusky sharks and copper sharks living in different coastal regions across the globe are separate populations of each species.



Asian elephants are protected by the Endangered Species Act. Photo courtesy Smithsonian Institution.

Circus President, Former Employee Charged in Asian Elephant Purchase

Tina and Jewel, two Asian elephants owned by the circus, are protected by the Endangered Species Act.

Study Finds Climate Change May Threaten Wolverine Population

The aggressive wolverine may not be powerful enough to survive climate change in the contiguous United States, according to new research by the National Center for Atmospheric Research.

Wind Power Buildout Could Kill Millions of Birds, Conservation Group Says

We need more data, the American Bird Conservancy said, adding that environmental oversight or assessment can help developers be certain that significant numbers of birds will not be harmed.

coca

Cocaine Production Quickens Destruction Of Colombia's Rainforests

A new study provides evidence that cultivating coca bushes, the source of cocaine, is speeding up destruction of rain forests in Colombia.

U.S. President Barack Obama

Obama Earns Average Grade on Environment, Group Says

Two year's into his term, Obama gets good grades for greenhouse gas endangerment finding but poor ones for endangered species from the Center for Biological Diversity.

Florida panther

Biological Diversity, PAN Sue EPA to Protect Species from Pesticides

The Center for Biological Diversity and Pesticide Action Network claim that the agency has failed to properly protect more than 200 endangered and threatened species from harmful pesticides.

Maquire daisy

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Is Delisting Maguire Daisy

Over the last 25 years, federal agencies have worked to bring the plant's population from seven to 163,000.

Without Intervention, Mariana Crow Would Go Extinct in 75 Years

Researchers from the University of Washington say the Mariana crow, a forest crow living on Rota Island in the western Pacific Ocean, will go extinct in 75 years, almost twice as soon as previously believed.

Growing Hypoxic Zones Reduce Habitat for Billfish and Tuna

Billfish and tuna, important commercial and recreational fish species, may be more vulnerable to fishing pressure because of shrinking habitat according to a new study.

Drone Image

Images from Aerial Drones Help Monitor Arctic Seal Population

A novel project that uses cameras mounted on unmanned aircraft flying over the Arctic is serving double duty: Not only is it assessing the characteristics of declining sea ice, but it’s also using the same aerial photos to pinpoint seals that have hauled up on ice floes.

Penn. Joins Wildlife Violator Compact, Stiffening Poaching Penalties

On Jan. 1, 2011, Pennsylvania will become the 36th member state of the Interstate Wildlife Violator Compact, under which the convicted wildlife violators will stand to lose their hunting privileges in all states enrolled in the compact, according to Pennsylvania Game Commission Executive Director Carl G. Roe.

USGS: Global Warming-Caused Sea-Ice Loss Not Irreversible

Sea-ice habitats essential to polar bears would likely respond positively should countries curb global greenhouse gas emissions.

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