Environmental Protection


Check Out the World’s Fastest Vegetable-oil-fueled Vehicle

The world’s fastest vegetable oil-fueled vehicle – conceived, built and driven by a team of Boise State University undergraduate students dubbed Greenspeed – will be on display Jan. 26-Feb. 5 at the Washington Auto Show in Washington, D.C.

Fungi: An Unexpected Ally Against Hazardous Lead Pollution

Fungi may be unexpected allies in our efforts to keep hazardous lead under control.

Diverse Ecosystems are Crucial Climate Change Buffer

Preserving diverse plant life will be crucial to buffer the negative effects of climate change and desertification in in the world's drylands, according to a new landmark study.

NREL Help Virgin Islands Cut Fuel Use

The tiny U.S. territory in the Caribbean has just 110,000 residents, all the beach, surf, wind and sun you'd ever want. The downside to this oasis is energy prices that are four to five times higher than are paid in the continental United States.

Fish Offspring Grow Best at Same Temperature as Parents

Fish parents can pre-condition their offspring to grow fastest at the temperature they experienced, according to research published in the February 2012 edition of Ecology Letters. This pre-conditioning, known as transgenerational plasticity (TGP), occurs whenever environmental cues experienced by either parent prior to fertilization changes how their offspring respond to the environment.

One-third of Car Fuel Consumption is Due to Friction Loss

No less than one third of a car's fuel consumption is spent in overcoming friction. This friction loss has a direct impact on both fuel consumption and emissions. However, new technology can reduce friction from 10 to 80 percent in various components of a car, according to a joint study by VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland and Argonne National Laboratory in the United States.

Sunflower Pattern Inspires New Concentrated Solar Power Plant Design To Increase Power Generation

Just outside Seville, in the desert region of Andalucia, Spain, sits an oasis-like sight: a 100-meter-high pillar surrounded by rows of giant mirrors rippling outward. More than 600 of these mirrors, each the size of half a tennis court, track the sun throughout the day, concentrating its rays on the central tower, where the sun’s heat is converted to electricity — enough to power 6,000 homes.

Maine DEP, The Nature Conservancy & Army Corps Announces $2.4 Million Awarded to Conserve Natural Resources in Maine

More than two million dollars will help public and non-profit groups restore and protect high priority wetlands and other natural resources across Maine.

Check Out the First-ever Portable Fuel Cell Charger That Runs on Water

PowerTrekk, a cutting-edge product that uses clean fuel cell technology that efficiently converts hydrogen into electricity.

Study Confirms Nature Responsible for 90 Percent of the Earth's Atmospheric Acidity

Satellites showing that nature is responsible for 90 percent of the earth’s atmospheric acidity shocked researchers from the Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy, whose findings have just been published in the journal Nature Geoscience.

Electronic Atlas Maps U.S. Renewable Energy Resources

A new geospatial application developed by the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the U.S. Department of Energy's primary national laboratory for renewable energy and energy efficiency research and development, allows users to easily and accurately map potential renewable energy resources in the United States.

Scientists Study How Nature Cleans Uranium From Colorado Aquifer

Rifle, Colo., is a small town on the Colorado River, in the heart of the Rocky Mountains, that's big on natural resources. It attracts hunters, fishermen, hikers, rock climbers. Its striking scenery attracted husband-and-wife environmental artists Christo and Jeanne-Claude as well; they stretched the Valley Curtain, a 200,200-square-foot orange sheet of nylon, across 1,250-foot-wide Rifle Gap. The curtain lasted only 28 hours before another of the area's natural resources, wind, began to tear it down.

Reuse of Municipal Wastewater Has Potential to Augment Future Drinking Water Supplies

With recent advances in technology and design, treating municipal wastewater and reusing it for drinking water, irrigation, industry and other applications could significantly increase the nation's total available water resources, particularly in coastal areas facing water shortages, says a new report from the National Research Council.

Lake Erie Algae, Ice, Make a Nice Mix in Winter

Clarkson University Biology Professor Michael R. Twiss has been working with colleagues and students from Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee and Ontario, to study Lake Erie over the past five winters during mid-winter, a time when the lake is more than 70 percent covered by ice.

EPA, State of Colorado, Childrens Hospital Highlight Benefits of New Mercury and Air Toxics Standards

At Children’s Hospital Colorado in Aurora, Colo., representatives from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) joined the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, Trout Unlimited, and ADA Environmental Solutions, Inc. to highlight the benefits of EPA’s newly issued Mercury and Air Toxics Standards, the first national standards to protect American families from power plant emissions of mercury and toxic pollutants such as arsenic, acid gas, nickel, selenium and cyanide.

Massachusetts Landlords Fined for Failing to Notify Holyoke Area Tenants about Lead Paint

The owners and manager of 11 housing units at 10 properties in the Holyoke area have agreed to pay a total of $16,000 to resolved claims by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) that they violated the federal lead paint disclosure law.

U.S. EPA Orders World’s Largest Metals & Electronics Recycler to Immediately Cease Illegal Discharge of Toxic Pollutants to San Francisco Bay

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has ordered Sims Metal Management, located at the Port of Redwood City, Calif., to comply with federal Clean Water Act laws following inspections that found evidence of unlawful discharges of PCBs, mercury, lead, copper and zinc into San Francisco Bay.

Mercury Deposition Greater Near Major U.S. Cities

Atmospheric deposition of mercury is about four-times higher in lakes near several major U.S. cities compared to lakes in remote areas, according to a new study by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

Dramatic Links Found Between Climate Change Elk, Plants and Birds

Climate change in the form of reduced snowfall in mountains is causing powerful and cascading shifts in mountainous plant and bird communities through the increased ability of elk to stay at high elevations over winter and consume plants, according to a groundbreaking study in Nature Climate Change.

Soil Microbiologists Discover Aberdeen Microbe of Global Agricultural Significance

Organisms that oxidize ammonia were first discovered in 1890. Although a natural process, a major consequence of the activities of such organisms in soil is the transformation and loss of nitrogen fertilizers used to improve crop production, resulting in groundwater and atmospheric pollution.

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