News and Articles


CARB Reviewing 2016 Enforcement Report This Week

The report will include highlights of 2016 enforcement activities in key programs including truck and bus requirements, vehicle certification and aftermarket parts, consumer products, and ocean-going vessels. Staff also will discuss the division's goals for 2017 and beyond.

Canadian National Railway Paying Environmental Fines

The company has been ordered to pay $2.5 million, which will go into the Environmental Damages Fund. An additional fine of $125,000 was levied on May 25, 2017, on provincial charges from Alberta Environment and Parks under the Environmental Protection and Enhancement Act.

Nuclear Technology Receives Large Funding Increase

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will be awarding nearly $67 million in nuclear energy research, development, facility access, as well as infrastructure projects.

What is PFAS—and Why Should You Care?

While toxicity studies have raised important concerns, there is still much we do not know about the effects of PFAS on human health and the environment. Out of the hundreds of known PFAS compounds, only a small number have been studied extensively.

Plastipak Wins Packaging Innovation Award

The company uses Direct Object Printing, a patented technology for packaging decoration. It uses specially developed inks that are fully compatible with closed-loop recycling and cured using low-energy LED lights, with images directly ink-jet printed on to plastic bottles and containers.

CDC

Involuntary Manslaughter Charges Filed in Flint Case

More than a dozen people now have been charged in the case, including Michigan Department of Health and Human Services Director Nick Lyon, and pre-trial hearings and other legal proceedings are occurring.

EIA Meeting to Examine Future of U.S. Nuclear Power

The 2017 EIA Energy Conference taking place June 26-27 will include a session on the future of nuclear power, examining the competitive challenges facing existing plants and the options available to plant owners and regulators.

Greening an Industry We Had Never Heard Of

Many in the U.S. logistics industry are "going green" for one very good reason: Becoming more sustainable helps them operate in a leaner, more efficient manner and is proving to be a major cost savings.

Canada Renews Western Waste Management Facility Operating License

The renewed license authorizes construction of new facilities, including storage buildings for low- and intermediate-level waste, in‑ground storage containers for intermediate-level waste, in-ground containers for heat exchangers, and storage buildings for used dry nuclear fuel.

Texas Water Development Board Approves Grants

Sharing $593,789 in grants through its Agricultural Water Conservation Grants Program are the North Plains Groundwater Conservation District, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension, and Texas A&M University-Kingsville.

Almost every metal is recyclable, yet the scrap metal doesn

Which is Better, Extracting Metal or Recycling Scrap Metal?

Recycling metal or salvaging scrap metal and selling to the recyclers can be a great income source. Recycling is less expensive than extracting metal, needs less energy, and helps in saving fuel.

Three Mile Island Plant May Close in 2019

Exelon Corporation's announcement said it is taking several "first steps" to shut down the nuclear power plant, even as the company explained what kind of relief it needs to keep the plant in operation.

Arizona Agency Applauds Water Company's Acquisition

"This acquisition is the first of what will be a series of 'wins' for rural water customers," said Commissioner Andy Tobin, chairman of the Commission's Water Committee. "Consolidations like this will often be the only solution for some companies that simply cannot deal with the infrastructure problems which put their customers' service and health at risk. There is still much work to be done."

New Water Towers to Ensure Continuous Service for New Orleans

The Sewerage and Water Board's $50 million project will erect two 200-foot-tall water tanks that will hold 4 million gallons of water. If there is a complete loss of power, the towers will provide uninterrupted water pressure and continuous water service to the city.

A More 'Permanent' Solution to Protecting Carbon Steel Structures from Corrosion

An innovative coating prevents corrosion of steel structures and appurtenances exposed to standing water, high humidity common in water treatment operations.

New York Agreement Expands Adirondack Park

NY Department of Environmental Conservation Commissioner Basil Seggos signed ceremonial maps to resolve title disputes spanning more than a century. The property will be added to the Adirondack Forest Preserve and opened to the public.

Swiss Voters Back Phaseout of Nuclear Power

They endorsed a new energy law that bans new nuclear power plants, supports renewable energy sources, and seeks to encourage lower energy consumption. The vote was 58 percent in favor.

TCEQ Touts Landfill Mining Projects' Potential

There are 200 to 300 closed landfills in Texas, so the potential for resource recovery and regaining land is huge, TCEQ reports.

Most at risk are outdoor workers, including agricultural workers, commercial fishermen, construction workers, transportation workers, and first responders, but workers in hot indoor environments such as warehouses and factories are also at risk of heat illnesses.

House Water Subcommittee Looking at Integrated Planning in U.S. Water Infrastructure

The hearing will focus on ways EPA can work with states and cities to develop integrated stormwater and wastewater requirements with more flexibility so communities can meet their Clean Water Act compliance obligations.

New Commissioner Chosen for Chicago Water Management Department

Randy Conner will oversee a program that has replaced 470 miles of water mains and 102 miles of sewer mains and has relined 271 miles of existing sewer. He will continue the Meter Save program, which installs water meters in Chicago homes to save residents money and promote water conservation.