Environmental Protection

Small-Scale Generator Runs on Used Motor Oil – With Low Emissions

he Phoenix 10 generator emitted 30 percent less sulfur dioxide and almost 50 percent less nitrogen oxide than a comparable generator running on diesel fuel.

Preliminary emissions testing of a small-scale waste-oil power generator have found that the system generates low emissions.

In tests conducted by an independent third party, the Phoenix 10 generator emitted 30 percent less sulfur dioxide (SO2) and almost 50 percent less nitrogen oxide (NOx) than a comparable generator running on diesel fuel. Cyclone Power Technologies and its licensee Phoenix Power Group (PPG) produce the generator.

Many state environmental agencies have set limits of five tons per year on SO2 and NOx; the Phoenix 10 demonstrated emissions of only 0.14 and 0.13 tons, respectively, of these toxic gases, were it to run for a year of 12-hour days.

The reason for these clean readings is Cyclone’s WHE-25 engine, which powers the Phoenix 10. As an external combustion engine, the WHE-25 is able to combust any fuel – even used motor oils – at temperatures and pressures below which many gasses such as NOx are formed. Other noxious particles are incinerated in the long combustion residence of the engine’s cyclonic chamber. When tested on diesel fuel for comparison purposes, the WHE-25 emitted approximately one-tenth the SO2 and NOx that a diesel internal combustion engine would.

“We are pleased with these preliminary findings, but not surprised,” stated Doug Petty, the vice president of PPG. “We know that the Cyclone engine is capable of combusting used oil in an environmentally sound manner, and thereby providing producers of this waste product with an alternative, revenue-producing method of disposal.”

According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, waste oil from one oil change can contaminate 1 million gallons of fresh water. The Phoenix 10 presents an economic incentive for users of motor oil to dispose of their waste in an environmentally friendly manner instead of one that could cause great harm to our water supply.

Cyclone and PPG will conduct a broader emission study during the system’s pilot testing begin in early 2011, and will announce those results when available. Emission testing was conducted by Alliance Source Testing of Decatur, Ala.


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