Environmental Protection

Watersheds


Emerging Contaminants Found in Narragansett Bay Waterhsed

A group of hazardous chemical compounds that are common in industrial processes and personal care products but which are not typically monitored by the Environmental Protection Agency have been detected throughout the Narragansett Bay watershed, according to a URI researcher.

Insight Into River Formation Came From Being in the Right Place at the Right Time

Geography professor Bruce Rhoads and geology professor Jim Best were conducting research where the Wabash River meets the Ohio River in the summer of 2008 when they heard about a new channel that had just formed, cutting off a bend in the winding Wabash just upstream from the confluence. That serendipity gave the researchers a rare view of a dynamic, little-understood river process that changed the local landscape and deposited so much sediment into the river system that it closed the Ohio River.

Researchers Deploy a Shocking Method of Fish Collection

A group of fisheries scientists from Tennessee Tech University are busy monitoring the health of the Caney Fork River by pumping electricity into the water.

Protecting Wild Species May Require Growing More Food on Less Land: Study

In parts of the world still rich in biodiversity, separating natural habitats from high-yielding farmland could be a more effective way to conserve wild species than trying to grow crops and conserve nature on the same land, according to a new study published today in the journal Science.

Scientists Call for Better Deep Sea Management

A recent study has found that it's being damaged by human activities, and that this is only likely to get worse. Scientists are now calling for better management and conservation of entire deep-sea ecosystems.

Tide's Retreat and Advance Not as Constant as You Might Think

The ebb and flow of the ocean tides, generally thought to be one of the most predictable forces on Earth, are actually quite variable over long time periods, in ways that have not been adequately accounted for in most evaluations of prehistoric sea level changes.

Camp Company Fined $38,000 for Filling Wetlands in North Carolina

Camp Clearwater Enterprises Inc. will pay $38,000 for illegally filling wetlands on its property in White Lake, N.C., in violation of the federal Clean Water Act.

New Tool Quantifies Economic Impact of Forest and Watershed Restoration in Oregon

The "Economic Impacts of Restoration Calculator for Oregon Counties" helps restoration practitioners better forecast the economic impacts of field-based restoration spending.



Discovery of Disease-Resistant Oysters Brings Call for Shift in Preservation Strategies

Development of disease resistance among Chesapeake Bay oysters calls for a shift in oyster-restoration strategies within the Bay and its tributaries.

Mega-dam in Peruvian Amazon Cancelled

The Peruvian government announced that the massive Inambari Dam, planned on a major Amazonian tributary, has been canceled after years of strong community opposition.

Major Flooding on Miss. River Likely to Cause Large Gulf of Mexico Dead Zone

Gulf of Mexico's hypoxic zone is predicted to be larger than average this year, due to extreme flooding of the Mississippi River this spring, according to an annual forecast by a team of NOAA-supported scientists.

Study: Stream Biodiversity Declines at Even Low Levels of Urban Development

A new study from biology researchers at Baylor University and the University of Maryland-Baltimore has found that there are consistent and widespread declines in stream biodiversity at lower levels of urban development more damaging than what was previously believed.

Research Tackles Effects of Dredging on Fish and River Habitats

Melinda Daniels, associate professor of geography, and Keith Gido, associate professor of biology, are collaborating on a project that involves habitat and fish sampling on the Kansas River, which stretches across northeast Kansas.

Tests Show Biosensor Can Guide Environmental Cleanups

Tests of a new antibody-based “biosensor” developed by researchers at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science show that it can detect marine pollutants like oil much faster and more cheaply than current technologies. The device is small and sturdy enough to be used from a boat.

Agency Asks for Comments on Watershed Approach Draft

The draft technical document includes an overview of key concepts, examples of assessments of healthy watershed components, and an integrated assessment framework for identifying healthy watersheds.

The Delaware River. National Park Service photo.

NYC to Adjust Reservoir Releases for Downriver States

The new plan should control the Delaware River's salt line and thereby protect aquatic life and drinking water supply that is shared with New Jersey, Delaware, and Pennsylvania.

South Dakota Awards $22.3M for Environmental Projects

The funds will go toward improving water, wastewater, and stormwater infrastructure as well as watershed, landfill, and recycling projects.

Water monitoring projects have been conducted all over the world this week.

World Monitoring Day Is Occasion for Water Announcements

Stephen R. Carpenter wins Stockholm Water Prize; WEF and IWA name water champions; WaterSense and American Water partner on PSAs.

Consol Energy to Pay $5.5M Penalty, $200M for Wastewater Controls

Using reverse osmosis technology, the underground coal mining company will build an advanced water treatment plant to remove chloride.

The Fish & Wildlife Service also has been involved in protecting fish in the Great Lakes.

Clarkson to Receive $6.5M to Continue Monitoring Great Lakes' Fish

With SUNY, the universities will monitor temporal trends in bioaccumulative chemicals in the Great Lakes using top predator fish as biomonitors.

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