Environmental Protection

Watersheds


Artificial Watershed Gets First Rain

The world’s only artificial watershed inside the Biosphere 2 at the University of Arizona receives its first rain, giving researchers the first opportunity to study how water, soil, plants, and microbes interact in a realistic setting; this rare chance could help improve future global climate models.

Upper Llano Watershed Coordination Committee to Hold Meeting in December

On Dec.11, a new group that hopes to protect and improve water quality and flows of North and South Llano Rivers will be holding a meeting. Local residents are encouraged to attend.

Sewage Problems Caused by Hurricane Sandy

In the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, millions of gallons of raw sewage are being dumped into New Jersey waterways. Scientists from the University of Delaware are using satellites to predict the sludge’s track into the ocean.

Salt Marsh Decline Due to Nutrient Levels

According to a new report from the Marine Biological Laboratory at Woods Hole, MA shows that the cause of the decline of salt marshes is caused from excess nutrients soaking into the marshes. Nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus from sewer systems and lawn fertilizers have been linked to salt marsh loss.

NYC Commences Huge Upgrade of Sewer and Water infrastructure

New York City begins fourth phase of sewer and water infrastructure that will help alleviate roadway flooding in Springfield Gardens, Queens.

Protected River in Florida Still in Decline

The Wekiva River in Florida is still in failing health, despite being one of the most protected waterways in the U.S.

Research Confirms Loss of Tropical Forests Reduces Rain

"Our study implies that deforestation of the Amazon and Congo forests could have catastrophic consequences for the people living thousands of kilometers away in surrounding countries," said lead author Dr. Dominick Spracklen.

Lead Sampling in Big River Flood Plain

EPA to Host April 5 Session in Byrnes Mill, Mo., to Discuss Residential Lead Sampling in Big River Floodplain of Southwest Jefferson County



EPA and LA Water Board Set Strict New Pollution Reduction Plans for 175 Waterways in Los Angeles Area

Action Culminates 13 Year Effort, Eliminating Beach Closures, Reducing Trash and Toxic Chemicals in Waters

Emerging Contaminants Found in Narragansett Bay Waterhsed

A group of hazardous chemical compounds that are common in industrial processes and personal care products but which are not typically monitored by the Environmental Protection Agency have been detected throughout the Narragansett Bay watershed, according to a URI researcher.

Insight Into River Formation Came From Being in the Right Place at the Right Time

Geography professor Bruce Rhoads and geology professor Jim Best were conducting research where the Wabash River meets the Ohio River in the summer of 2008 when they heard about a new channel that had just formed, cutting off a bend in the winding Wabash just upstream from the confluence. That serendipity gave the researchers a rare view of a dynamic, little-understood river process that changed the local landscape and deposited so much sediment into the river system that it closed the Ohio River.

Researchers Deploy a Shocking Method of Fish Collection

A group of fisheries scientists from Tennessee Tech University are busy monitoring the health of the Caney Fork River by pumping electricity into the water.

Protecting Wild Species May Require Growing More Food on Less Land: Study

In parts of the world still rich in biodiversity, separating natural habitats from high-yielding farmland could be a more effective way to conserve wild species than trying to grow crops and conserve nature on the same land, according to a new study published today in the journal Science.

Scientists Call for Better Deep Sea Management

A recent study has found that it's being damaged by human activities, and that this is only likely to get worse. Scientists are now calling for better management and conservation of entire deep-sea ecosystems.

Tide's Retreat and Advance Not as Constant as You Might Think

The ebb and flow of the ocean tides, generally thought to be one of the most predictable forces on Earth, are actually quite variable over long time periods, in ways that have not been adequately accounted for in most evaluations of prehistoric sea level changes.

Camp Company Fined $38,000 for Filling Wetlands in North Carolina

Camp Clearwater Enterprises Inc. will pay $38,000 for illegally filling wetlands on its property in White Lake, N.C., in violation of the federal Clean Water Act.

New Tool Quantifies Economic Impact of Forest and Watershed Restoration in Oregon

The "Economic Impacts of Restoration Calculator for Oregon Counties" helps restoration practitioners better forecast the economic impacts of field-based restoration spending.

Discovery of Disease-Resistant Oysters Brings Call for Shift in Preservation Strategies

Development of disease resistance among Chesapeake Bay oysters calls for a shift in oyster-restoration strategies within the Bay and its tributaries.

Mega-dam in Peruvian Amazon Cancelled

The Peruvian government announced that the massive Inambari Dam, planned on a major Amazonian tributary, has been canceled after years of strong community opposition.

Major Flooding on Miss. River Likely to Cause Large Gulf of Mexico Dead Zone

Gulf of Mexico's hypoxic zone is predicted to be larger than average this year, due to extreme flooding of the Mississippi River this spring, according to an annual forecast by a team of NOAA-supported scientists.

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