Environmental Protection

Sustainability


Farmer networks hold key to agricultural innovation in developing countries

New technologies can improve agricultural sustainability in developing countries, but only with the engagement of local farmers and the social and economic networks they depend on, say Stanford University researchers.

Researchers Look at Energy-Efficient Programming to Curb Computers' Power Use

Researchers have created a system, called EnergJ, that reduces energy consumption in simulations by up to 50 percent, and has the potential to cut energy by as much as 90 percent.

Access to Plastics Recycling More Widespread Than Previously Believed

A much larger portion of Americans have access to recycle plastic bottles and also can recycle other types of plastic containers, such as yogurt cups, dairy tubs, and lids.

Army Showcases Quantum Hybrid at Indy 500

The U.S. Army's Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) demonstrated the Clandestine Extended Range Vehicle (CERV) as part of special events ramping up to the Indianapolis 500. The U.S. Army labeled the CERV as one of the "greenest technologies" and demonstrated how its advanced hybrid electric powertrain developed by Quantum Fuel Systems Worldwide Inc. and TARDEC saves taxpayer dollars and soldiers' lives.

Report: Cost Obstructs Path to Alagae-Based Biofuel Market Worth Billions

According to a recent report from Pike Research, despite limited production to date, the scale-up potential of algae is substantial compared to other non-food based feedstocks.

EPA's GreenChill Program Works to Revolutionize Supermarket Refrigeration

Supermarkets are among the most energy-intensive buildings around, and refrigeration uses more than half of that energy. That doesn't even include the harm that leaking refrigerants cause to the ozone layer. EPA's GreenChill program works with companies and their refrigeration engineers across the country to help program participants lower their refrigeration emissions of all kinds.

First Fuel Cell to Power Residential Building in New York Installed in Roosevelt Island

The Octagon, a LEED Silver 500-unit apartment community on Roosevelt Island, made green history by becoming the first residential building in the State of New York to be powered and heated by a 400 kW fuel cell from UTC Power.

U.S., Russia Reaffirm Cooperation on Energy-Efficiency and Smart Grid

The United States Agency for International Development, working with the U.S. Department of Energy to cooperate with Russia on energy-efficiency efforts and smart grids, is supporting efforts to share experience and best practices among U.S. and Russian municipalities and utilities.



World's Most Environmentally Friendly Skyscraper to be Built in Pittsburgh (With Video)

The PNC Financial Services Group Inc. plans to construct the world’s most environmentally friendly skyscraper in Pittsburgh.

European Commission Funds Large-Scale Bioproducts-from-Algae Project

Nine partners from seven countries have joined in a project to show that ethanol, biodiesel and bioproducts can be produced from algae on a large scale.

Schools Recycle More than 2.3 Million Cans, Raise More than $34,000 in National Competition

Schools across America recycled more than 2.3 million aluminum beverage cans through a new national recycling competition sponsored by the can industry. The recycled cans, totaling more than 68,000 pounds, generated more than $34,000 for school activities and other uses.

Beyond the Barn: Keeping Dairy Cows Outside is Good for the Outdoors

Computer simulation studies by scientists at the U.S. Department of Agriculture suggests that a dairy cow living year-round in the great outdoors may leave a markedly smaller ecological hoofprint than its more sheltered sisters.

Santa Clara University Partners with Ayllu to Create Map of Off-Grid Energy Solutions

The map provides detailed graphs and analysis of 40 social enterprises in 16 countries that are overcoming vast hurdles in their respective markets to bring electricity or alternative fuel to 500 to 500,000 people apiece.

CEO: Signs that U.S. is Using Less Water Are Everywhere

Klaus Reichardt, CEO of Waterless Co., said his conclusion is based on a new book, "The Big Thirst," by Charles Fishman.

World Bank to Loan Ukraine $200M for Energy-Efficiency Project

The World Bank’s board of directors has approved a $200 million loan to finance investments in energy-saving programs in industrial companies, municipalities and municipal-owned companies, as well as energy service companies in Ukraine, reports the World Bank on its website.

Landfill Gas Powers GM Plant for New Fuel-sipping Cars

Forty percent of the energy to power the General Motors Orion Assembly Plant will come from burning landfill gas created nearby.

Study Predicts Cellulosic Ethanol Won't Contribute to Renewable Fuel Targets by 2022

The study details 12 technologies and 36 projects that convert wood to fuels including ethanol, butanol, diesel, gasoline, and jet fuel.

G-OIL Makes its NASCAR Debut With Kenny Wallace at Dover International Speedway

Green Earth Technologies Inc. has entered a multi-race partnership with RAB Racing with Brack Maggard, promoting G-OIL motor oil at Dover International Speedway. RAB Racing will showcase G-OIL on the No. 09 Toyota Camry driven by Kenny Wallace for four NASCAR Nationwide Series events in 2011.

PepsiCo Rolls Out Ecofriendly Recyclable and Compostable Cups (With Video)

PepsiCo has begun offering five options of eco-friendly, recyclable and compostable cups to Foodservice customers in the United States through company-owned and independent bottler distribution systems.

“Biochar” More Effective, Cheaper at Removing Phosphate from Water

A process developed by University of Florida researchers using partially burned organic matter called biochar could provide an affordable solution to the problem of abundant phosphate in the water.

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