Environmental Protection

Environmental Health and Safety


Expansion of Forests in the European Arctic Could Result in the Release of Carbon Dioxide

Carbon stored in Arctic tundra could be released into the atmosphere by new trees growing in the warmer region, exacerbating climate change, scientists have revealed.

GM Adds Landfill-Free Facilities

GM recently added its 100th landfill-free facility – a parts distribution center in Lansing, Mich. It is a milestone in the company’s ongoing waste-reduction efforts.

Two Seafood Processors Settle Clean Air Violations for Improper Handling of Refrigerants

American Seafoods Company LLC and Pacific Longline Company LLC have agreed to phase out the use of ozone depleting refrigerants, implement a comprehensive leak detection and repair program aboard a number of their vessels and pay a penalty to resolve federal Clean Air Act violations.

Grasshoppers Frightened By Spiders Affect Whole Ecosystem

How do grasshoppers who are being frightened by spiders affect our ecosystem? In no small measure, say researchers at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and at Yale University in the US.

Single-Track Sustainability 'Solutions' Threaten People and Planet, Experts Say

A radical new approach to science and innovation is urgently needed to steer us within planetary boundaries and secure human wellbeing, fostering diverse types of innovation and empowering the grassroots creativity of poorer people, some experts say.

Climate Change Will Alter Risks of Wildfire Worldwide, Some Shifts Rapid, Extensive

A Texas Tech University climate scientist said climate change is widely expected to disrupt future fire patterns around the world, with some regions, such as the western United States, seeing more frequent fires within the next 30 years.

EPA Issues Framework to Help Local Governments Manage Stormwater Runoff

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has announced a new framework to help local governments meet their Clean Water Act obligations.

EPA and Local Puerto Rico Government Reps Meet to Discuss Environmental Challenges

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Regional Administrator Judith A. Enck met on Thursday, June 7, 2012 in New York City with representatives of local governments from Puerto Rico to discuss environmental challenges facing municipal governments in Puerto Rico, and explore solutions.



Article: Population Growth Leads to Environmental Stress

In an article published in the journal Nature Climate Change, researchers take a critical look at the various factors that have long been prime climate-change suspects. One in particular: The role of population growth.

Great Lakes Initiative Cleanup Helps Restore Grand Calumet River

The recent completion of a $52 million project to rid Roxana Marsh of contaminated sediment will speed the recovery of Indiana’s Grand Calumet River, marking a step forward for one of the Great Lakes’ most complex Area of Concern cleanups.

Humans are Primary Cause of Global Ocean Warming Over Past 50 Years, Research Shows

The oceans have warmed in the past 50 years, but not by natural events alone. New research shows that the observed ocean warming over the last 50 years is consistent with climate models only if the models include the impacts of observed increases in greenhouse gas during the 20th century.

Global Warming Threat Seen in Fertile Soil of Northeastern U.S. Forests

Vast stores of carbon in U.S. forest soils could be released by rising global temperatures, according to a study by UC Irvine and other researchers in today's online Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, D.C.

Today's Climate More Sensitive to Carbon Dioxide Than in Past 12 Million Years

In the journal Nature, paleoclimate researchers reveal that about 12-5 million years ago climate was decoupled from atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. In the last five million years, changes in ocean circulation allowed Earth's climate to become more closely coupled to changes in carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere.

Microbial Communities Changed After Deepwater Horizon Spill

Communities of microbial organisms -- species such as nematodes, protists and fungi -- on beaches along the Gulf of Mexico changed significantly following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in April 2010, research from the University of New Hampshire’s Hubbard Center for Genome Studies (HCGS) and partners found.

Republic Services, Foristar and Duke Energy Dedicate Gas-to-Energy Plant in N.C.

Leading environmental services company Republic Services, Inc., FORTISTAR and Duke Energy dedicated a new, state-of-the-art, landfill gas-to-energy plant in North Carolina with a ribbon-cutting event at the site today.

Environmental Monitoring of Algal Blooms in a River System

CAS DataLoggers recently provided the data-logging solution for an environmental organization monitoring an outbreak of algal blooms in a major river.

EPA and Partners Announce "My Air, My Health" Challenge

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) and the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Office of the Coordinator for Health Information Technology have announced a nationwide challenge called My Air, My Health (MAMH).

Ecologists Call for Preservation of Planet's Remaining Biological Diversity

Twenty years after the Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro, 17 prominent ecologists are calling for renewed international efforts to curb the loss of biological diversity, which is compromising nature's ability to provide goods and services essential for human well-being.

Consumption Driving Environment Damage: UN

A group of scientists from around the world is warning that population growth, widespread destruction of natural ecosystems, and climate change may be driving Earth toward an irreversible change in the biosphere, a planet-wide tipping point that would have destructive consequences absent adequate preparation and mitigation.

Arctic Ice Melt is Setting Stage for Severe Winters

The dramatic meltoff of Arctic sea ice due to climate change is hitting closer to home than millions of Americans might think.

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