Environmental Protection

Endangered Species


Are New England's Iconic Maples At Risk?

Results from the first study of the Asian longhorned beetle (ALB) in forests show that the invasive insect can easily spread from tree-lined city streets to neighboring forests.

Panda Poop May Be a Treasure Trove of Microbes for Making Biofuels

Panda poop contains bacteria with potent effects in breaking down plant material in the way needed to tap biomass as a major new source of “biofuels” produced not from corn and other food sources, but from grass, wood chips and crop wastes, scientists reported.

Mich. Man Pleads Guilty to Illegally Importing Polar Bear Trophy from Canada

Rodger Dale DeVries, 73, a resident of Jenison, Mich., has pleaded guilty to illegally importing a polar bear trophy mount in 2007 from Canada into Michigan in violation of the Marine Mammal Protection Act.

Grassland Plant Species Play Import Roles in Biodiversity

Recent study of grasslands shows that species variety more important to ecosystem services than previously thought.

Another Study Finds Bluefin Tuna In Need of Protection

The team’s analysis—published in a recent issue of Science magazine’s Policy Forum—is the first study of global tuna and billfish populations using the methods of the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

Map Identifies Important Coral Reefs Exposed to Stress

The study, say the authors, will help to conserve some of the world’s most important coral reefs by identifying reef systems where biodiversity is high and stress is low, ecosystems where management has the best chance of success.

Is Hunting Wolves Key to Their Conservation?

Hunters have been credited with being strong conservation advocates for numerous game species in multiple countries. Would initiating a wolf hunt invoke the same advocacy for the carnivores?

Legal Sharks Aim to Protect Real Sharks

The University of Denver (DU) Sturm College of Law Environmental Law Clinic filed a federal lawsuit aiming to protect the porbeagle shark from overfishing that has pushed the species to the brink of extinction and left it in need of federal protection, the students say.



Study Finds Artificial Reefs are Friendly to Fish, Economy and Public

The reefs, which provide habitat for popular sport fish and other marine life, pulled more than $253 million into the region during one year, the study found. Though it costs nothing more than a saltwater fishing license to use the submerged structures as a fishing spot, anglers spend money on food, lodging, fuel, tackle and other necessities.

Study: Stocks of Tuna, Other Fish Threatened with Extinction

A new study by top global fisheries experts presents an alarming assessment of several economically important fish populations. The analysis of 61 species of "scombrids," which include tunas, bonitos, mackerels and Spanish mackerels, and billfishes, which include swordfish and marlins, classified seven as threatened with extinction and four as "near threatened" for the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

Snow Leopard Population Discovered in Afghanistan

The Wildlife Conservation Society has discovered a surprisingly healthy population of rare snow leopards living in the mountainous reaches of northeastern Afghanistan's Wakhan Corridor, according to a new study.

Court Upholds Endangered Species Act Protection for Polar Bears

A federal judge upheld a May 2008 decision that polar bears throughout their range should be protected as a “threatened” species under the U.S. Endangered Species Act.

Wildlife Surviving Ongoing Conflict in Afghanistan

A new survey conducted by WCS scientists, supported by the U.S. Agency for International Development, reveals that large mammals, including Asiatic black bears, gray wolves, markhor goats, and leopard cats, are surviving in parts of Afghanistan after years of conflict.

Discovery of Disease-Resistant Oysters Brings Call for Shift in Preservation Strategies

Development of disease resistance among Chesapeake Bay oysters calls for a shift in oyster-restoration strategies within the Bay and its tributaries.

Honduran President Lobo Sosa Announces Shark Sanctuary

The designation encompasses the 92,665 square miles of the country's exclusive economic zone on its Pacific and Caribbean coasts.

Native Bees, Essential to Plant Pollination, Are Picky About Where They Live: Study

The study found that, overall, composition of a plant community is a weak predictor of the composition of a bee community, which may seem counterintuitive at first, said USGS scientist and study lead Ralph Grundel

Research Tackles Effects of Dredging on Fish and River Habitats

Melinda Daniels, associate professor of geography, and Keith Gido, associate professor of biology, are collaborating on a project that involves habitat and fish sampling on the Kansas River, which stretches across northeast Kansas.

Athletes Scale Peaks, Swim Seas to Raise Funds for Clean Oceans, Water

Mitigating damage from environmental problems is a daunting task, especially considering the scope of the project. Despite the great size of the problems facing the environment, the sheer size of these issues can leave those in a position to do a little something about it feeling paralyzed. But for those used to taking on the Earth’s biggest challenges – literally oceans and mountains – pursuing relief after such disasters is all in a day’s work.

Endangered Barred Owls Perhaps More Abundant Than Previously Thought

Barred owls may be more abundant in coniferous forests of the Pacific Northwest than previously recognized, according to research published in the Journal of Wildlife Management.

Scientists Can Track Origin of Shark Fins Using DNA Zip Coding

An international team of scientists has used DNA to determine that groups of dusky sharks and copper sharks living in different coastal regions across the globe are separate populations of each species.

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