Environmental Protection

Endangered Species


Scientists Rediscover the Leggiest Animal on Earth

Once believed to be extinct, a rare millipede with 750 legs has been found by scientists in California.

Reserve Allows Great Study of Brazil's Atlantic Rainforest

Brazil's Salto Morato Nature Preserve is a haven for scientists studying the dwindling Atlantic rainforest, an area less renowned than the Amazon forest but just as biologically diverse and equally threatened by human encroachment.

Global Warming Hinders Species' Recovery After Mass Extinction

Researchers have discovered that global warming is the reason plants and animals had a hard time recovering from the largest mass extinction in Earth’s history 250 million years ago.

World's Rarest Whale Seen for First Time

A whale species that is nearly unknown to science has been seen for the first time after a mother and her calf were stranded on a New Zealand beach.

100 Million-Year-Old Coelacanth Fish Species Discovered in Texas

Pieces of tiny fossil skull found in Fort Worth have been identified as 100 million-year-old coelacanth bones, according to paleontologist John F. Graf, Southern Methodist University, Dallas.

Global Warming Creates Change in Species Interactions

According to a recent study, climate change was found to typically lead to local extinctions and declines by influencing interactions between species, such as reducing prey populations for predators. Little evidence has been found to support declining or extinct species due to direct effects of higher temperatures.

Study to Determine Water Amount Needed for Steelhead Fish to Flourish

CITRIS researchers will implant 40 to 50 anadromous steelhead trout with acoustic tags to determine how much water they need in order to thrive.

10,000 Birds Die as "Everglades of West" Dries, Spreads Disease

Officials from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) are estimating that over 10,000 migrating birds have died so far this year because of reduced water flow to the Lower Klamath National Wildlife Refuge in Oregon and California. Officials say the final death toll may be close to 20,000 birds.



Another Vertebrate Species Reported Extinct from the Hawaiian Islands

A species of lizard is now extinct from the Hawaiian Islands, making it the latest native vertebrate species to become extirpated from this tropical archipelago.

Plans for Guam Wildlife Habitat Project Move Forward

After 25 years, former waste dump converted to endangered wildlife habitat in Guam.

Genetic Survey of Endangered Antarctic Blue Whales Shows Surprising Diversity

More than 99 percent of Antarctic blue whales were killed by commercial whalers during the 20th century, but the first circumpolar genetic study of these critically endangered whales has found a surprisingly high level of diversity among the surviving population of some 2,200 individuals.

Federal Officials Announce Nationwide Crackdown on Black Market Rhino Trade

The Department of Justice and the Department of the Interior recently announced the arrest of seven people charged with trafficking endangered black rhinoceros horns.

Penn State Research Finds Humans and Climate Contributed to Extinctions of Large Ice-Age Mammals

Both climate change and humans were responsible for the extinction of some large mammals, according to research that is the first of its kind to use genetic, archeological, and climatic data together to infer the population history of large Ice-Age mammals.

Researchers: Apply Public Trust Doctrine to 'Rescue' Wildlife from Politics

When a species recovers enough to be removed from the federal endangered species list, the public trust doctrine – the principle that government must conserve natural resources for the public good – should guide state management of wildlife, scientists say.

New Approach Challenges Old Ideas About Plant Species and Biomass

For decades, scientists have believed that a relationship exists between how much biomass plant species produce and how many species can coexist. Stanley Harpole, assistant professor in the Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology at Iowa State University, was part of the team researching productivity and richness, and he says the research doesn’t support that relationship.

U.S. Takes Diplomatic Action Against Icelandic Whaling

U.S. President Barack Obama announced diplomatic measures the United States will take against Iceland to condemn its whaling activities.

Protecting Wild Species May Require Growing More Food on Less Land: Study

In parts of the world still rich in biodiversity, separating natural habitats from high-yielding farmland could be a more effective way to conserve wild species than trying to grow crops and conserve nature on the same land, according to a new study published today in the journal Science.

Analysis Shows Namibia's Seals are Worth More Alive Than Dead

It reveals that, in 2008, the seal hunt generated only $513,000 – a poor comparison to seal-watching, which netted $2 million in direct tourism expenditure in the same period

Panda Poop May Be a Treasure Trove of Microbes for Making Biofuels

Panda poop contains bacteria with potent effects in breaking down plant material in the way needed to tap biomass as a major new source of “biofuels” produced not from corn and other food sources, but from grass, wood chips and crop wastes, scientists reported.

Are New England's Iconic Maples At Risk?

Results from the first study of the Asian longhorned beetle (ALB) in forests show that the invasive insect can easily spread from tree-lined city streets to neighboring forests.

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