Environmental Protection

Ecosystems


Maine DEP and Coast Guard to Test Marine Spill Response on Damariscotta River

Responders from the Maine Department of Environmental Protection, the US Coast Guard and Moran Environmental Recovery will participate in a boom deployment exercise on the Penobscot River on Tuesday, May 22 and Wednesday, May 23.

Humanmade Pollutants May Be Driving Earth's Tropical Belt Expansion

Black carbon aerosols and tropospheric ozone, both humanmade pollutants emitted predominantly in the Northern Hemisphere's low- to mid-latitudes, are most likely pushing the boundary of the tropics further poleward in that hemisphere, new research by a team of scientists shows.

Nearly One Tenth of Western Hemisphere Mammals Unlikely to Outrun Climate Change

A safe haven could be out of reach for 9 percent of the Western Hemisphere's mammals, and as much as 40 percent in certain regions, because the animals just won't move swiftly enough to outpace climate change.

Push from Mississippi Kept Deepwater Horizon Oil Slick Off Shore

When the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig exploded April 20, 2010, residents feared that their Gulf of Mexico shores would be inundated with oil. And while many wetland habitats and wildlife were oiled during the three-month leak, the environmental damage to coastal Louisiana was less than many expected, in part because much of the crude never made it to the coast.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Seeking Ideas to Strengthen Incentives for Wildlife Conservation

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today announced the extension of a public process exploring the expansion of incentives for voluntary partnerships with private landowners and other land stewards to help conserve imperiled wildlife.

Nanotube Sponge has Potential in Oil Spill Cleanup

Carbon nanotubes, which consist of atom-thick sheets of carbon rolled into cylinders, have captured scientific attention in recent decades because of their high strength, potential high conductivity and light weight. But producing nanotubes in bulk for specialized applications was often limited by difficulties in controlling the growth process as well as dispersing and sorting the produced nanotubes.

Study Says Wind Can Carry Away Soil Particles That Help Build Soil and Recycle Nutrients

It was all too evident during the Dust Bowl what a disastrous impact wind can have on dry, unprotected topsoil. Now a new study has uncovered a less obvious, but still troubling, effect of wind: Not only can it carry away soil particles, but also the beneficial microbes that help build soil, detoxify contaminants and recycle nutrients.

Plastic Trash Altering Ocean Habitats

A 100-fold upsurge in human-produced plastic garbage in the ocean is altering habitats in the marine environment, according to a new study led by a graduate student researcher at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego.



Warming Affects Ecosystems Not Just Biodiversity

Ecosystems perform important tasks – like nutrient cycling, breakdown of waste and carbon storage – on which humans depend, so it's important we understand how climate change might affect them.

Study Shows Antarctic Waters Changing due to Climate

The densest waters of Antarctica have reduced dramatically over recent decades, in part due to man-made impacts on the climate, Australian scientists said Friday.

Lightning Signature Could Help Reveal Solar System Origins

An electromagnetic signature called the Schumann Resonance could be used to study other planets besides Earth in the solar system and could shed light on how the solar system formed, according to a paper published in the Astrophysical Journal.

Global Change Puts Plankton Under Threat

Changes in the ocean’s chemistry, as a result of increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) levels, threaten marine plankton to a greater extent than previously thought, according to new research.

Scientists Core Into Clear Lake in California to Explore Past Climate Change

Scientists at University of California, Berkeley, will begin drilling into ancient sediments at the bottom of Northern California's Clear Lake to look at how today's plants and animals will adapt to climate change and increasing population.

Ecosystem Effects of Biodiversity Loss Could Rival Impacts of Climate Change and Pollution

Biodiversity loss could impact ecosystems as much as climate change, pollution and other major forms of environmental stress, according to a new study by an international research team.

Study Shows Experiments Underestimate Plant Responses to Climate Change

Researchers from UC San Diego have analyzed 50 plant studies on four continents to see how plants will respond to climate change in the future. Their study, published this week in the journal Nature, found that shifts in the timing of flowering and leafing in plants due to global warming appear to be much greater than estimated by warming experiments.

Gas Development Linked to Wildlife Habitat Loss

Intense development of the two largest natural gas fields in the continental United States is driving away some wildlife from their traditional wintering grounds, according to a study by the Wildlife Conservation Society.

SeaWorld and Busch Gardens Parks Say Goodbye to Plastic Bags

Paper or plastic? Soon there will be just one choice at the 10 theme parks of SeaWorld Parks & Entertainment -- paper -- as the company eliminates plastic shopping bags within the next year. SeaWorld Parks & Entertainment will be the largest theme park operator to make this commitment.

New Tools Launched to Determine Solar, Wind Energy Potential on Contaminated Lands

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have developed and launched new tools designed to test underutilized sites and contaminated land for solar and wind energy potential. The tools give local communities and landowners ways to evaluate sites for renewable energy potential without the need for technical expertise.

Almost Seven Million Birds Perish at Communication Towers in North America Each Year

Every year nearly 7 million birds die as they migrate from the United States and Canada to Central and South America, according to a new University of Southern California (USC) study published in the journal PLoS ONE.

Marine Scientists Urge Government to Reassess Oil Spill Response

On the second anniversary of the Deepwater Horizon blowout, a national panel of researchers including University of Georgia marine scientist Samantha Joye is urging the federal government to reassess how it would respond to similar oil spills that might occur in the future.

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