Environmental Protection

Ecosystems


Infrared Lasers Assess Forest Vegetation

A Texas A&M University associate professor in the department of ecosystem science and management uses remote sensing and other advanced technology to see individual trees and the overall forest.

New Study to Determine the Air Quality Effects of Open Fire Cooking

The National Center for Atmospheric Research is launching a three-year, international study to determine the impact open-fire cooking has on regional air quality and disease.

Cooked Algae Transforms into Crude Oil

Michigan Engineering researchers can "pressure-cook" algae for as little as a minute and transform 65% of the organisms into biocrude.

Proposed Site Announced for Tennessee's 55th State Park

During a special ceremony attended by state and local government officials, it was announced that the Rocky Fork area of Unicoi County will become Tennessee’s 55th state park.

Funding Available for Environmental Research and Development

The Department of Defense’s (DoD) Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) is seeking to fund environmental research and development proposals.

Burning Fossil Fuels Could Lead to Sea Level Rise

Study by scientists has found that burning all the Earth’s reserves of fossil fuels could cause sea levels to rise by as much as five meters – with levels continuing to rise for typically 500 years after carbon dioxide emissions ceased.

New Study Measures Methane Emissions

A research team led by the University of Texas at Austin is conducting a major field study to measure the methane emissions produced from natural gas production. The study is expected to be completed by Jan. 13, 2013.

Groundwater Cleanup Project in San Gabriel Valley Aided by EPA Settlement

The EPA reached a settlement of $1.44 million with TDY Industries, LLC to help pay for groundwater cleanup at the South El Monte portion of the San Gabriel Valley Area 1 Superfund Site in Los Angeles, California.



New Jersey Awarded Grant for Recycling Effort

The state acknowledged Ridgewood's recycling efforts this week, awarding the village more than $55,000 in grant money to continue its environmental protection initiatives.

Beetle Decline Increases Concern for Insect Ecosystems

A recent study shows that the populations of beetles are dwindling, and this could end up being just as problematic as the problems of bees and butterflies.

Fisheries Jeopardizing Marine Ecosystems

According to Dr. Pikitch, current and recent studies demonstrate the need for "a more precautionary approach to fisheries management, in which fishing is restricted to those places and amounts where it can be conducted safely and with minimal risk of jeopardizing the integrity of marine ecosystems."

Less Biodiversity Decreases Climate Change Resilience

A new study has found that the impact of climate change is likely to be worse if species are lost. High biodiversity increases the likelihood that some species will be sufficiently resilient to a changing environment.

Speed Limits on Cargo Ships Could Reduce Emissions

Putting a speed limit on cargo ships as they sail near ports and coastlines could cut their emission of air pollutants by up to 70 percent, reducing the impact of marine shipping on Earth's climate and human health.

100 Million-Year-Old Coelacanth Fish Species Discovered in Texas

Pieces of tiny fossil skull found in Fort Worth have been identified as 100 million-year-old coelacanth bones, according to paleontologist John F. Graf, Southern Methodist University, Dallas.

Boeing Recognized for Leadership in Revitalization of Superfund Site

The EPA will present an award to Boeing for its leadership to help revitalize the Chemical Commodities, Inc. (CCI) Superfund Site in Olathe, KS. Boeing has worked with the Olathe community to install a pollinator habitat and educational trail for monarch butterflies during their pollination season throughout the Midwest.

Forest Fertilization May be Beneficial

Professors and researchers are studying how fertilization of forests can increase productivity and carbon sequestration as part of the Pine Integrated Network Education, Mitigation and Adaptation Project (PineMap).

Louisiana Wetlands Could be Restored by Mississippi River Diversions

In Nature Geoscience, a group of geologists from the University of Pennsylvania used the Mississippi River flood of 2011 to observe how new diversions in the Mississippi River’s levees could help restore the wetlands in Louisiana.

Funds Awarded by EPA to Lower Ocean Pollution

More than $214,000 in grants was awarded to the Monterey Bay Aquarium and the Product Stewardship Institute, Inc. in California in hopes of reducing sources of ocean pollution in partnership with local students, governments, and businesses.

Salt Marsh Decline Due to Nutrient Levels

According to a new report from the Marine Biological Laboratory at Woods Hole, MA shows that the cause of the decline of salt marshes is caused from excess nutrients soaking into the marshes. Nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus from sewer systems and lawn fertilizers have been linked to salt marsh loss.

Solar Plants in Mojave Desert Could Help Conservation and Energy Needs

Solar developers are looking to the Mojave Desert for the construction of solar plants that could turn the sun’s heat into electricity.

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