Environmental Protection

Ecosystems


New Smithsonian Exhibit Highlights Worldwide Waterways

The Smithsonian's Anacostia Community Museum presents its groundbreaking exhibition "Reclaiming the Edge: Urban Waterways and Civic Engagement" on view through Sept. 15, 2013, which examines the consequences of the abuse of waterways worldwide and the efforts by communities to restore them.

Artificial Watershed Gets First Rain

The world’s only artificial watershed inside the Biosphere 2 at the University of Arizona receives its first rain, giving researchers the first opportunity to study how water, soil, plants, and microbes interact in a realistic setting; this rare chance could help improve future global climate models.

Upper Llano Watershed Coordination Committee to Hold Meeting in December

On Dec.11, a new group that hopes to protect and improve water quality and flows of North and South Llano Rivers will be holding a meeting. Local residents are encouraged to attend.

Money from affordable housing grants helps revamp local parks, including these shade structures.

How Parks are Funded by Affordable Housing

Since the establishment of a state program that donates money to cities and counties for parks when affordable housing communities are built, California has received more than $20 million in funds.

A Tobacco Tree Could be Used as Biofuel

Researchers at Royal Holloway have identified a tobacco tree that could produce biofuels, and have been awarded a grant for further research from the European Union.

Drought Stress Makes Forest Ecosystems Vulnerable

Researchers have found that increasing drought conditions have made plants operate at their top safety threshold, making forest ecosystems vulnerable to escalating environmental stress.

Real Christmas Trees Less Harmful to Environment than Artificial Trees

According to a plant biologist, buying a real Christmas tree is better on the environment than using an artificial one for a few years and then throwing it away.

Ancient Microbes Found in Antarctic Lake

Scientists have discovered ample and diverse metabolically active bacteria in an Antarctic lake sealed under more than 65 feet of ice.



Lidar Confirms Coastal Impacts of Hurricane Sandy

In a new U.S. Geological Survey analysis of recently collected lidar coastal data, the devastation and future coastal vulnerability of the region after Hurricane Sandy wreaked havoc is clear. The research documented particularly dramatic impacts within the Fire Island National Seashore on Long Island, NY.

Similarities Found in White Nose Syndrome Recovery in Bats and AIDS Patients

In a study performed by the U.S.G.S., bats recovering from white-nose syndrome (WNS) show evidence of IRIS, a condition that is experienced by HIV-AIDS patients. If IRIS is proven to be present in bats surviving WNS, this would be the first natural occurrence of IRIS ever observed.

New Technology Prevents Flies from Maturing

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has developed a new insect growth regulator that helps combat house flies that spread harmful bacteria to food.

Bird Virus Sweeping Through Britain

Avian pox has been recorded in British bird species such as house sparrows and wood pigeons for a number of years. However, the emergence of a new strain of this viral disease is causing concern amongst vets and ornithologists.

Biofuel Spills Could be More Dangerous than Oil

Researchers from the University of Michigan found that ethanol-based liquids mix actively with water, making a biofuel spill potentially more harmful to aquatic life than oil spills.

Warming Temperatures Increase Stress on Public Lands

Researchers have discovered that climate change is creating additional stress on western rangelands, and as a result land owners should consider a reduction or elimination of livestock and other large animals from public lands.

Future Warming on Higher End of Climate Projections

Climate model projections showing a greater rise in global temperature are likely to prove more accurate than those showing a lesser rise, according to a new analysis by scientists at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR).

Scientists Rediscover the Leggiest Animal on Earth

Once believed to be extinct, a rare millipede with 750 legs has been found by scientists in California.

Plants and Soils Could Intensify Climate Change

Scientists from the American Meteorological Society (AMS) and the University of California, Berkley have demonstrated that plants and soils could release large amounts of carbon dioxide as global climate warms.

Sewage Problems Caused by Hurricane Sandy

In the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, millions of gallons of raw sewage are being dumped into New Jersey waterways. Scientists from the University of Delaware are using satellites to predict the sludge’s track into the ocean.

First Green Roofs Ecology Research Center in Israel

Israel’s first Green Roofs Ecology research center has been dedicated at the University of Haifa. The center will focus on research and development of non-irrigated green roofs that are suitable for Middle Eastern climates.

Warmer Temperatures Cause Aquatic Animals to Shrink

According to a new study, warmer temperatures cause greater reduction in the sizes of adult aquatic animals than in land-dwelling species.

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