Environmental Protection

Air


Increased Deaths From Lung Disease Tied to More Fires in Southeast Asia During El Niño

After studying a decade’s worth of satellite images, a team of researchers found what appears to be a correlation between El Niño events and increased deaths due to the pollutants in smoke from fires.

50-Year Decline Found in Some Los Angeles Vehicle-Related Pollutants

In California's Los Angeles Basin, levels of some vehicle-related air pollutants have decreased by about 98 percent since the 1960s, even as area residents now burn three times as much gasoline and diesel fuel.

Pine Trees One of Biggest Contributors to Air Pollution

Pine trees are one of the biggest contributors to air pollution. They give off gases that react with airborne chemicals -- many of which are produced by human activity -- creating tiny, invisible particles that muddy the air.

The Economic Cost of Increased Temperatures

Even temporary rises in local temperatures significantly damage long-term economic growth in the world's developing nations, according to a new study co-authored by an MIT economist.

Report Puts Lens on Built Environment's Link to Asthma

The design firm Perkins+Will has released what it calls the first-ever report on asthmagens and asthma triggers in building materials and products.

Mapping Tool Expanded to Include Arctic Waters

NOAA and the Interior Department's Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement have expanded the online mapping tool used by emergency responders during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill response to include the Arctic, calling this step important for any response needed in the region.

EPA Announces Funding for Research to Improve Air Quality, Protect Health

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) awarded five grants totaling almost $2 million to academic institutions for research on innovative processes to further improve air quality in the U.S. and help track the effectiveness of pollution control measures.

Tiny Airborne Pollutants Lead Double Life Study

The observations could have important implications for modelling global climate change and predicting air quality conditions. The tiny particles, which form part of an airborne chemical mix above cities, play a role in pollution by providing a surface for chemical reactions and in climate by reflecting and absorbing solar radiation and by acting as seed surfaces for water condensation and cloud formation.



Illinois Man Sentenced to 10 Years in Prison for Clean Air Act Violations Involving Asbestos

Duane “Butch” O’Malley, 59, of Bourbonnais, Ill., who was convicted by a federal jury on September 26, 2011, for the illegal removal, handling and disposal of asbestos from a Kankakee building in August 2009, was sentenced to 10 years in prison by Federal District Court Judge Michael McCuskey.

Cloud Seeds and Ozone Holes

The destruction of atmospheric ozone can take place within newly forming Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs), which serve as the battleground for manmade chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) to attack and destroy ozone.

Study: Cool Climate, Not Population Loss, Led to Fewer Fires

In the years after Columbus' voyage, burning of New World forests and fields diminished significantly – a phenomenon some have attributed to decimation of native populations by European diseases. But a new University of Utah-led study suggests global cooling resulted in fewer fires because both preceded Columbus in many regions worldwide.

Adam M. Fasano, CIH of GZA GeoEnvironmental, Promoted to Principal

Adam M. Fasano, CIH has been promoted to Principal at GZA GeoEnvironmental’s Norwood, MA office. GZA is an environmental and geotechnical consulting firm.

Climate Change Linked to Ozone Loss: May Result in More Skin Cancer

For decades, scientists have known that the effects of global climate change could have a potentially devastating impact across the globe, but Harvard researchers say there is now evidence that it may also have a dramatic impact on public health.

Surprising Link Between Ice and Atmosphere

Researchers have found a way to use GPS to measure short-term changes in the rate of ice loss on Greenland -- and reveal a surprising link between the ice and the atmosphere above it.

Unprecedented Greenland Ice Sheet Surface Melt

For several days this month, Greenland's surface ice cover melted over a larger area than at any time in more than 30 years of satellite observations.

EPA Kicks Off Third Annual Energy Star National Building Competition

Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Energy Star program launched the 2012 National Building Competition: Battle of the Buildings with a record 3,200 buildings across the country going head to head to improve energy efficiency, lower utility costs and protect health and the environment.

Rise in Temperatures and CO2 Follow Each Other Closely in Climate Change

The greatest climate change the world has seen in the last 100,000 years was the transition from the ice age to the warm interglacial period.

Fools' Gold Found to Regulate Oxygen

Sulfur has traditionally been portrayed as a secondary factor in regulating atmospheric oxygen, with most of the heavy lifting done by carbon. However, new findings that appeared this week in Science suggest that sulfur's role may have been underestimated.

Global CO2 Emissions Continued to Increase in 2011

Global emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) -- the main cause of global warming -- increased by 3% last year, reaching an all-time high of 34 billion tonnes in 2011.

Scientists Connect Seawater Chemistry With Ancient Climate Change and Evolution

Scientists from the University of Toronto and the University of California Santa Cruz are shedding light on one potential cause of the cooling trend of the past 45 million years that has everything to do with the chemistry of the world's oceans.

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