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Prairie Soil May Provide Answers to Countering Climate Change

Explaining the purchase of a hundred pounds of dry ice to the authorities might be a bit awkward for some people; however, for Ari Jumpponen, associate professor of biology at Kansas State University, it's just another day as a scientist.

Archeologists Investigate Ice Age Hominins Adaptability to Climate Change

Computational modeling that examines evidence of how hominin groups evolved culturally and biologically in response to climate change during the last Ice Age also bears new insights into the extinction of Neanderthals. Details of the complex modeling experiments conducted at Arizona State University and the University of Colorado - Denver will appear in the December issue of the journal Human Ecology.

Environmental Troubles Growing in Middle East Gulf Region Due to Rapid Coastal Development

The rapid, large scale coastal development underway in the Middle East must be better planned and managed to avoid aggravating degradation and losses in the fragile marine ecosystems shared by eight Gulf countries – Bahrain, Kuwait, Iran, Iraq, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates – warns a new report by the United Nations University (UNU).

Duke University Study Offers Seven Safeguards for Hydraulic Fracturing

A new report by Duke University researchers offers several health and environmental measures for North Carolina lawmakers to consider as they debate legalizing horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing for natural gas.

Going to Extremes to Find Greener Chemicals

Extremophiles that happily live in seemingly harsh environments can inspire useful chemical processes, and their enzymes could help make chemical processes in industry greener.

Thousand-color Sensor Reveals Contaminants in Earth and Sea

Technology with the ability to detect more than 1,000 colors, the hyperspectral camera is being used to diagnose contaminants and other environmental hazards in real time.

Study: Even the Cleanest Wastewater Contributes to More Super Bacteria

A new study reveals that the release of treated municipal wastewater – even wastewater treated by the highest-quality treatment technology – can have a significant effect on the quantities of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, often referred to as "superbacteria," in surface waters.

Researchers use classic antennas to harness more power from the sun

Researchers are now developing a solar panel composed of nano-antennas instead of semiconductors.



California Man Sentenced to Prison for Illegally Storing Toxic, Explosive Hazardous Waste in Backyard

The sentence is the longest handed down by a California federal judge in a hazardous waste case.

Non-therapeutic Use of Antibiotics in Farming Contributes to Antibiotic Resistance

Researchers say there is overwhelming evidence that non-therapeutic use of antibiotics contributes to antibiotic resistance.

Using Air Pollution Thresholds to Protect and Restore Ecosystem Health

Air pollution is changing our environment and undermining many benefits we rely on from wild lands, threatening water purity, food production, and climate stability, according to a team of scientists writing in the Ecological Society of America's Issues in Ecology.

Antarctic Rocks Help Predict Sea Levels

Ancient rocks embedded in the West Antarctic ice sheet could help University scientists improve sea level predictions.

Climate Policies Can Help Resolve Energy Security And Air Pollution Challenges

Policies to protect the global climate and limit global temperature rise offer the most effective entry point for achieving energy sustainability, reducing air pollution, and improving energy security, according to an article published in the latest issue of Nature Climate Change.

Ancient Midges Offer Clues to Climate Variability 10,000 Years Ago

An analysis of the remains of ancient midges – tiny non-biting insects closely related to mosquitoes – opens a new window on the past with a detailed view of the surprising regional variability that accompanied climate warming during the early Holocene epoch, 10,000 to 5,500 years ago.

Clothing, Food and Electricity Impact Most on Water Footprint

Australians have been working hard to cut down their household’s daily water consumption, however a new study in the latest edition of Building Research & Information reveals that clothing, food and electricity are the three biggest culprits for a household’s high water usage.

NCAR Wind Forecasts Save Millions of Dollars for Xcel Energy

The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) has developed a highly detailed wind energy forecasting system with Xcel Energy, enabling the utility to capture energy from turbines far more effectively and at lower cost. The system, which Xcel Energy formally took over last month, saves ratepayers several million dollars yearly.

Department of Energy Helps Consumers Better Manage Their Energy Consumption

As part of the Administration’s commitment to ensuring a clean energy future, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced that up to $8 million in funding will be made available to encourage utilities, local governments and communities to create programs that empower consumers to better manage their electricity use through improved access to their own electricity consumption data.

Federal Government Highlights Economic Benefits of Electronics Recycling

Officials from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. General Services Administration (GSA) toured e-Green Management of Islip Terrace, New York to highlight the environmental, public health and economic benefits of recycling electronics.

Indiana Waste Treatment Company Charged with Conspiracy and Violating the Clean Water Act

Tierra Environmental and Industrial Services Inc., a centralized waste treatment facility in East Chicago, Ind., its owner and a manager were charged with conspiracy and felony violations of the Clean Water Act in a seven-count indictment returned by a federal grand jury.

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