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More Growers Adopting Agricultural Technology

Research shows that it takes about eight years from the time public research funds are invested in technology development to the time the technology is first implemented.

Certain Crops Show Higher Capacity for Carbon Fixation

Salt can have drastic effects on the growth and yield of horticultural crops; studies have estimated that salinity renders an about one-third of the world's irrigated land unsuitable for crop production.

New Model Shows How Building Pollutants Make it Into The Environment

Anti-fungal and anti-bacterial additives in house paint are present in dangerous quantities in the Vauchère river basin in the city of Lausanne, says a study to be presented at the American Geophysical Union (AGU) conference in San Francisco.

As Climate Change Sets In, Plants and Bees Keep Pace

No laggards, those bees and plants. As warm temperatures due to climate change encroach winter, bees and plants keep pace.

15 New Conservation Concerns

A review carried out by a group of international specialists has identified several emerging issues that are likely to damage biodiversity in the coming years.

Report Calls for Energy-smart Food

A Massey University energy expert says the global agriculture industry, including that of New Zealand, must reduce its dependence on fossil fuels to secure food supply in the future.

The High Winds of The Upper Atmosphere Contain Less Renewable Energy Than Previously Assumed

It seems that the energy mix of the future will have to differ from the current suggestions of some visionaries.

Can Marcellus Shale Gas Development and Healthy Waterways Sustainably Coexist?

Amity, Pa., epicenter of the natural gas-containing geological formation known as the Marcellus Shale. Amity lies in Washington County near Anawanna, Pa. Once, home to Native Americans that named the town Anawanna, or "the path of the water," in recognition of its many rivers and streams.



Climate Change Blamed for Dead Trees in Africa

Trees are dying in the Sahel, a region in Africa south of the Sahara Desert, and human-caused climate change is to blame, according to a new study led by a scientist at the University of California, Berkeley.

Chemically Scrubbing CO2 From The Air Too Expensive

While it is possible to chemically scrub carbon dioxide from Earth's atmosphere in order to lessen the severity of global warming, the process is prohibitively expensive for now. Best to focus on controls for coal-burning power plants, say researchers.

EPA Releases Releases Findings of Wyoming Ground Water Investigation

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released a draft analysis of data from its Pavillion, Wyo., ground water investigation. At the request of Pavillion residents, EPA began investigating water quality concerns in private drinking water wells three years ago.

Experts Call on Governments, Industries and The Water and Trade Research Communities

With greater water scarcity in some regions and increasing global demand for high quality water, international trade agreements need to help save water globally.

Ottawa Cannot Legislate Climate Change Policy

Earlier this year the federal government introduced sector-by-sector emissions reduction regulations as its stand on climate change. However, according to Prof. Al Lucas and co-author Jenette Yearsley, the Constitution limits Ottawa's ability to enact climate change legislation limiting greenhouse gas emissions.

Coral Reefs in Warming Seas

Disease outbreaks are often associated with hot weather. Because many bacteria typically multiply more rapidly in warmer conditions, it's a commonly held notion that warm-weather outbreaks are a straightforward consequence of greater numbers of the microbial culprit.

For Midwesterners, More Boxcars Mean Cleaner Air

Shifting a fraction of truck-borne freight onto trains would have an outsized impact on air quality in the Midwest, according to researchers at the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

New Scientific Review Highlights Biodiversity and Climate Change

A major new scientific review, involving more than 30 scientists from Australia, New Zealand and the Pacific Islands sets out our current knowledge of the impacts of climate change on biodiversity in the latest special edition of the scientific journal Pacific Conservation Biology.

Landsat Satellites Track Yellowstone's Underground Heat

Yellowstone National Park sits on top of a vast, ancient, and still active volcano. Heat pours off its underground magma chamber, and is the fuel for Yellowstone's famous features -- more than 10,000 hot springs, mud pots, terraces and geysers, including Old Faithful.

Researchers Assess Radioactivity Released to the Ocean from the Fukushima Nuclear Facility

With news this week of additional radioactive leaks from Fukushima nuclear power plants, the impact on the ocean of releases of radioactivity from the plants remains unclear. But a new study by U.S. and Japanese researchers analyzes the levels of radioactivity discharged from the facility in the first four months after the accident and draws some basic conclusions about the history of contaminant releases to the ocean.

EPA and New York State Announce Ban on Dumping Sewage from Boats into Lake Ontario

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation recently announced that a 3,675 square mile area of Lake Ontario is now a “no discharge zone,” which means that boats are completely banned from discharging sewage into the water.

Sewage Treatment Plants May Contribute to Antibiotic Resistance Problem

Water discharged into lakes and rivers from municipal sewage treatment plants may contain significant concentrations of the genes that make bacteria antibiotic-resistant. That's the conclusion of a new study on a sewage treatment plant on Lake Superior in the Duluth, Minn., harbor that appears in American Chemical Society's journal Environmental Science & Technology.

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