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Civic Works to Receive $300,000 EPA Brownfields Training Grant

Civic Works in Baltimore will receive a $300,000 Environmental Workforce Development and Job Training Grant to help train low-income residents for environmental jobs.

The Future of Cover Crops

Winter cover crops are an important component of nutrient cycling, soil cover and organic matter content. Although its benefits are well documented, cover crop use in farming systems is relatively low.

Protein Complex Found to Regulate Plant Growth

Farmers and other astute observers of nature have long known that crops like corn and sorghum grow taller at night. But the biochemical mechanisms that control this nightly stem elongation, common to most plants, have been something of a mystery to biologists—until now.

Justice Department, EPA Focus on Environmental Justice in Newark, N.J.

New Jersey has seen an unjust share of environmental damage, and EPA and DOJ join forces to do something about it.

Oregon Pesticide Company to Pay $54,000 for Using Outdated Labeling on Products

On at least 52 separate occasions in 2008 to 2009, Orcal sold and distributed pesticide with incorrect labeling.

Birth Defects Study Adds Urgency to Appalachian Mountaintop Removal Health Concerns

Scientists, environmental advocates, and Appalachian residents affected by mountaintop removal called on Congress to heed the warning in new research that suggest a link between mountaintop removal mining and elevated rates of certain birth defects.

Desalinating Seawater with Minimal Energy Use

At a pilot facility in Singapore, Siemens has cut the energy needed to desalinate seawater by more than 50 percent.

EPA Strengthens Key Scientific Database to Protect Public Health

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recently announced plans to improve its Integrated Risk Information System program as part of an ongoing effort initiated in 2009 to strengthen the program.



EPA Clean Air Milestones in Texas

EPA recently announced that all ‘flexible permit’ companies in Texas have agreed to apply for approved air permits, helping to achieve clean air in the state and providing for regulatory certainty.

Herbicide Resistance, Weeds Are Spreading in the United States

Herbicide resistance is growing. At least 21 weed species have now developed resistance to glyphosate, a systemic herbicide that has been effectively used to kill weeds and can be found in many commercial products.

Viruses Found in 40 Percent of European Recreational Waters

European researchers have found viruses in nearly 40 percent of more than 1,400 recreational water samples gathered from coastal and inland areas in nine countries, including Spain.

Researchers to Study Effect of CO2 Injection on Geological Formations

In a test project, researchers plan to inject some 20,000 tons of carbon dioxide into a coalbed methane field in southwest Virginia, at a site that is not suitable for underground mining purposes.

First-of-its-Kind Cellulosic BioRefinery in Iowa Will Create Jobs, Displace 13.5 Million Gallons of Gasoline Annually

Unlike many conventional corn ethanol plants, Project LIBERTY will use corncobs, leaves and husks -- sources provided by local farmers -- that do not compete with feed grains.

Nut Company Plants Park in Nation's Capital

Mr. Peanut is arriving in Washington, D.C. – by way of his new biodiesel Nutmobile – to open a new urban park, Planters Grove, in Northeast D.C.

Study Finds Substantial Uncertainty With Natural Proxy Temperature Reconstruction

Since 1998, climate scientists have attempted to reconstruct global annual temperature over the last millennium using natural proxies such as tree rings and ice cores. However, a new study finds substantial uncertainty in these reconstructions.

Tips Tuesday: Five Tips to Green Your Summer Vacation

The summer travel season is here and whether you are traveling by train, plane or automobile, your vacation is likely to increase your carbon footprint. Gary Gero, president of the Climate Action Reserve, a Los Angeles-based nonprofit that registers and issues carbon offsets, offers five easy and affordable ways to reduce the impact of your summer travel on the planet.

Researchers Dig Deep Into Wyoming Basin for Global Warming Clues

About 55 million years ago, the Earth burped up a massive release of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere – an amount equivalent to burning all the petroleum and other fossil fuels that exist today.

Climate Change Reducing Ocean’s Carbon Dioxide Uptake

As one of the planet’s largest single carbon absorbers, the ocean takes up roughly one-third of all human carbon emissions, reducing atmospheric carbon dioxide and its associated global changes.But whether the ocean can continue mopping up human-produced carbon at the same rate is still up in the air.

Most Likely U.S. Metros to Withstand Natural Or Economic Disaster

Which U.S. metro region is most likely to come out of the next recession, natural disaster or other regional “shock” relatively unscathed? Rochester, Minn. A little more battered might be College Station-Bryan, Texas.

KPMG Reduces Carbon Footprint Through Living Green Initiative

KPMG LLP, the U.S. audit, tax and advisory firm, recently announced it achieved a 22 percent carbon reduction over three years from its 2007 baseline target, as part of its plan to improve the environmental performance of its business.

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