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Energy Star Initiative Recognizes Products with Highest Energy Efficiency

EPA and DoE recently announced, for the first time, products recognized as the most energy-efficient in their categories among those that have earned the Energy Star label.

New Paper Evaluates The Future of Water Recycling

The authors point out in the paper that the biggest problem with DPR is community acceptance, despite the fact that factors such as population growth and climate change mean that existing water supplies must go further in the future.

Thomas Edison Descendants Support Choice in Bulbs: "Technology Changes. Embrace It"

Four direct descendants of Thomas Edison, the man who invented the incandescent light bulb 132 years ago, strongly oppose a House vote seeking to limit consumer choice and block progress on more modern, more energy-efficient bulbs.

The Future of Cover Crops

Winter cover crops are an important component of nutrient cycling, soil cover and organic matter content. Although its benefits are well documented, cover crop use in farming systems is relatively low.

Civic Works to Receive $300,000 EPA Brownfields Training Grant

Civic Works in Baltimore will receive a $300,000 Environmental Workforce Development and Job Training Grant to help train low-income residents for environmental jobs.

Protein Complex Found to Regulate Plant Growth

Farmers and other astute observers of nature have long known that crops like corn and sorghum grow taller at night. But the biochemical mechanisms that control this nightly stem elongation, common to most plants, have been something of a mystery to biologists—until now.

Justice Department, EPA Focus on Environmental Justice in Newark, N.J.

New Jersey has seen an unjust share of environmental damage, and EPA and DOJ join forces to do something about it.

Oregon Pesticide Company to Pay $54,000 for Using Outdated Labeling on Products

On at least 52 separate occasions in 2008 to 2009, Orcal sold and distributed pesticide with incorrect labeling.



Birth Defects Study Adds Urgency to Appalachian Mountaintop Removal Health Concerns

Scientists, environmental advocates, and Appalachian residents affected by mountaintop removal called on Congress to heed the warning in new research that suggest a link between mountaintop removal mining and elevated rates of certain birth defects.

Desalinating Seawater with Minimal Energy Use

At a pilot facility in Singapore, Siemens has cut the energy needed to desalinate seawater by more than 50 percent.

EPA Strengthens Key Scientific Database to Protect Public Health

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recently announced plans to improve its Integrated Risk Information System program as part of an ongoing effort initiated in 2009 to strengthen the program.

EPA Clean Air Milestones in Texas

EPA recently announced that all ‘flexible permit’ companies in Texas have agreed to apply for approved air permits, helping to achieve clean air in the state and providing for regulatory certainty.

Viruses Found in 40 Percent of European Recreational Waters

European researchers have found viruses in nearly 40 percent of more than 1,400 recreational water samples gathered from coastal and inland areas in nine countries, including Spain.

Researchers to Study Effect of CO2 Injection on Geological Formations

In a test project, researchers plan to inject some 20,000 tons of carbon dioxide into a coalbed methane field in southwest Virginia, at a site that is not suitable for underground mining purposes.

First-of-its-Kind Cellulosic BioRefinery in Iowa Will Create Jobs, Displace 13.5 Million Gallons of Gasoline Annually

Unlike many conventional corn ethanol plants, Project LIBERTY will use corncobs, leaves and husks -- sources provided by local farmers -- that do not compete with feed grains.

Herbicide Resistance, Weeds Are Spreading in the United States

Herbicide resistance is growing. At least 21 weed species have now developed resistance to glyphosate, a systemic herbicide that has been effectively used to kill weeds and can be found in many commercial products.

Researchers Dig Deep Into Wyoming Basin for Global Warming Clues

About 55 million years ago, the Earth burped up a massive release of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere – an amount equivalent to burning all the petroleum and other fossil fuels that exist today.

Tips Tuesday: Five Tips to Green Your Summer Vacation

The summer travel season is here and whether you are traveling by train, plane or automobile, your vacation is likely to increase your carbon footprint. Gary Gero, president of the Climate Action Reserve, a Los Angeles-based nonprofit that registers and issues carbon offsets, offers five easy and affordable ways to reduce the impact of your summer travel on the planet.

Nut Company Plants Park in Nation's Capital

Mr. Peanut is arriving in Washington, D.C. – by way of his new biodiesel Nutmobile – to open a new urban park, Planters Grove, in Northeast D.C.

Climate Change Reducing Ocean’s Carbon Dioxide Uptake

As one of the planet’s largest single carbon absorbers, the ocean takes up roughly one-third of all human carbon emissions, reducing atmospheric carbon dioxide and its associated global changes.But whether the ocean can continue mopping up human-produced carbon at the same rate is still up in the air.

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