Environmental Protection

News


Evidence Clears Ben Frankin of Importing Tallow Trees

Genetic tests on more than 1,000 Chinese tallow trees from the United States and China show the famed U.S. statesman did not import the tallow trees that are overrunning thousands of acres of U.S. coastal prairie from Florida to East Texas.

Caterpillar Inc. to Pay $2.55M to Resolve Clean Air Act Violations

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) announced a settlement with Caterpillar Inc. to resolve alleged Clean Air Act violations for shipping more than 590,000 highway and non-road diesel engines without the correct emissions controls.

Berkeley Labs' User Test Bed Facility to Advance Research, Development of Energy-efficient Buildings

The facility will allow researchers and manufacturers to test buildings systems and components under real-world conditions by swapping out systems and changing configurations and then allow rigorous monitoring of performance of every key building element that impacts energy consumption.

EPA Proposes Air Pollution Standards for Oil and Gas Production

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently proposed standards to reduce harmful air pollution from oil and gas drilling operations.

The Economic, Environmental Benefits of Reducing Nitrogen Pollution

A new study shows reducing nitrogen pollution generated by wastewater treatment plants can come with "sizable" economic benefits, as well as the expected benefits for the environment.

For ‘Smart’ Resource Distribution Technologies, It’s a Good-News/Bad-News Situation

These findings are from the first wave of the 2011 E2 (Energy + Environment) Study. Conducted by Market Strategies twice a year, the national survey is designed to gain an understanding of Americans' attitudes and opinions about energy and energy-related issues.

Geographic Analysis Offers New Insight Into Coral Disease Spread

In the last 30 years, more than 90 percent of the reef-building coral responsible for maintaining major marine habitats and providing a natural barrier against hurricanes in the Caribbean has disappeared because of a disease of unknown origin.

Midwest Experiences Dangerous Air Quality; Chicago Close to Breaking 1871 Rain Record

A record 6.86 inches of rain that fell Saturday, July 23, and 4.37 more on Wednesday, July 27, is causing rivers to crest, blocking roads, stopping public transportation, causing power outages and flooding basements. Chicago is close to breaking an 1871 weather record for number of rainy days in July.



Proposed Natural Gas Act Hits Washington

Senior energy executive Karl W. Miller is a major supporter in establishing a comprehensive energy plan for the U.S.

Bacteria Can Fertilize Copper Polluted Soil

When miners abandoned Michigan’s Copper Country, they left a lot of the red metal behind, and not in a good way. Waste from the mining operations still contains a high fraction of copper, so high that almost nothing can grow on it—and hasn’t for decades, leaving behind moonscape expanses that can stretch for acres.

A Geological View of Global Erosion

Erosion happens. But for the modern geologist a vexing question remains: how fast does this erosion happen? For more than a century, scientists have looked for ways to measure and compare erosion rates across differing landscapes around the globe—but with limited success.

A Water Purification Unit that Generates its Own Energy

A new biological water purification facility developed by Siemens generates enough methane gas to power its own operations.

Arctic Tundra Fires Could Accelerate Climate Warming

After a 10,000-year absence, wildfires have returned to the Arctic tundra, and a University of Florida (UF) study shows that their impact could extend far beyond the areas blackened by flames.

How Light-colored Roads, Rooftops Can Help Cool the Planet

New Berkeley Lab study investigates climate consequences of cool roofs and large-scale solar panel deployment.

Renewable Jet Fuels From Sugarcane?

Boeing, Embraer and the Inter-American Development Bank will jointly fund a sustainability analysis of producing renewable jet fuel sourced from Brazilian sugarcane.

EPA Considering New Toxicity Testing for BPA

Following a BPA Action Plan announced in March 2010, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is requesting public comment on possible toxicity testing and environmental sampling to study BPA’s potential environmental impacts.

Concrete Presents Solid, Eco-Friendly Option in Home-Décor

Concrete can serve a multitude of uses in decorating the home, from artful flooring to sturdy countertops. It is also remarkably eco-friendly. It uses byproducts from other industries in its creation and is largely recyclable when you're done with it.

UIC Biologists Poll Pollinators for Urban Agriculture

"Eat locally, grow locally" has become a mantra of today's move to a more sustainable lifestyle. But growing fruits and vegetables in your own neighborhood often depends on some helping hands -- or legs and wings -- from an army of insect pollinators, notably bees.

Detroit Metro Airport Installing Electric Vehicle Charging Stations

DTE Energy, a Detroit-based diversified energy company involved in the development and management of energy-related businesses and services nationwide, recently announced that it will install four Plug-in Electric Vehicle charging stations at Detroit Metro Airport – part of a program to deploy 16 such public charging stations throughout Southeastern Michigan.

Veterans Medical Center to Pay Civil Penalty to Settle Hazardous Waste Issues

The Robert J. Dole Veterans Administration Medical Center in Wichita, Kan., has agreed to pay a $17,979 civil penalty to the United States to settle a series of hazardous waste violations on its campus.

Free e-News Subscription

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy