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Another Study Finds Bluefin Tuna In Need of Protection

The team’s analysis—published in a recent issue of Science magazine’s Policy Forum—is the first study of global tuna and billfish populations using the methods of the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

Waste Facility Agrees to $1.7M Settlement for Alleged Hazardous Waste Violations

In a settlement valued at more than $1.7 million, Clean Harbors of Braintree Inc. has agreed to pay a significant penalty and perform additional projects, to settle a complaint filed by the U.S. Department of Justice on behalf of EPA, regarding numerous violations of hazardous waste management and emergency planning laws at the company’s Braintree, Mass., facility.

Ethane Levels Yield Information About Changes in Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Recent data from NSF-funded research in both Greenland and Antarctica demonstrate that fossil-fuel related emissions of both methane and ethane, two of the most abundant hydrocarbons in the atmosphere, declined at the end of the twentieth century, according to a paper published Thursday in the journal Nature.

EPA Seeks Input on the Development of Drinking Water Perchlorate Regulation

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is inviting small businesses, governments, and not-for-profit organizations to participate as small entity representatives (SERs) for a small business advocacy review (SBAR) panel.

Food for Thought: The Most Earth-Friendly Way to Dispose of Food Waste

Consider the apple core. From an environmental perspective, what’s the most responsible way to dispose of it, or a banana peel, or any food waste?

Sewage Still Plagues Hudson River

People are swimming in the Hudson again, and while clumps of sewage rarely float by anymore, the water is not reliably clean, according to a recent report released from the environmental group Riverkeeper.

Study Reveals Nature and Humans Quite Similar

World financial markets may be reeling from new setbacks, but it turns out there’s a secret economy right under our noses and it’s thriving. The movers and shakers, however, are plants and fungi.

Arctic Cruise Explores Changing Ocean Acidification

Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey will embark on a research cruise to the Arctic Ocean beginning today to collect water samples and other data to determine trends in ocean acidification from the least explored ocean in the world.



Smithsonian and Tribal Communities Launch Environmental Education Website

the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian launches a new educational website, “American Indian Responses to Environmental Challenges,” that will target middle and high school teachers, students and the general public.

Study: Late-’90s Arctic Ice Melt Caused Half by GHGs, Half by Normal Climate Conditions

These findings point to climate change and variability working together equally to accelerate the observed sea ice loss during the late 20th century.

Reversing E. Coli's Metabolism Produces Biofuels, Chemicals at Rapid Clip

Rice University engineering researchers unveiled a new method for rapidly converting simple glucose into biofuels and petrochemical substitutes

Scientists Investigate Link Between Human Populations and River Phosphorus Concentrations

High concentrations of phosphorus in aquatic ecosystems are often associated with human activities in the surrounding area, such as agriculture and urban development.

Map Identifies Important Coral Reefs Exposed to Stress

The study, say the authors, will help to conserve some of the world’s most important coral reefs by identifying reef systems where biodiversity is high and stress is low, ecosystems where management has the best chance of success.

California Park Gets Green Makeover

The playground at Bristol Park in Turlock, Calif., is roughly 20 years old, in major need of a facelift and some TLC.

The City of Newport, RI Will Upgrade Facilities and Pay Fine to Settle Clean Water Violations

Under the terms of a settlement lodged in federal court, the City of Newport has agreed to eliminate illegal discharges of sewage into Narragansett Bay from its wastewater treatment plant and wastewater collection system.

South Florida Farmers Achieve Record Year in Water Quality Success

Farmers in the Everglades Agricultural Area (EAA), south of Lake Okeechobee, achieved a record-setting 79 percent phosphorus reduction in the water leaving the farming region -- more than three times less phosphorus than the state requirement.

Did You Know Paper Money Contains A Potentially Toxic Substance?

The cash register receipts that people place near paper money in billfolds, purses and pockets has led to a worldwide contamination of paper money with a potentially toxic substance.

Most Plant Species Important in Various and Varying Ecosystems

There are many different types of plants in grasslands around the world. According to a new analysis of plants in grassland ecosystems around the world, it turns out that most of those plant species are important.

Researchers Find High Energy Output From Algae-Based Fuel But No 'Silver Bullet'

Algae-based fuel is one of many options among the array of possible future energy sources. New University of Virginia research shows that while algae-based transportation fuels produce high energy output with minimal land use, their production could come with significant environmental burdens.

Ecologist: Young Forests Will Remain Important Carbon Sinks

The Ohio State researchers argue that in this case, as forests age, they get rejuvenated with younger individuals of different species – a more-complex and -diverse community will be replacing the old guard.

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