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Students at The University of Findlay Living Green in Campus Houses

The houses at 138 and 146 W. Foulke Ave. on the campus of The University of Findlay, Ohio, may look like “normal” student residences, but the students living in those houses chose to live there with a common goal to reduce energy consumption and to lower their carbon footprints.

Production of Biofuel from Forests will Increase Greenhouse Emissions

The largest and most comprehensive study yet done on the effect of biofuel production from West Coast forests has concluded that an emphasis on bioenergy would increase carbon dioxide emissions from these forests at least 14 percent, if the efficiency of such operations is optimal.

U.S. Residents Say Hawaii's Coral Reef Ecosystems Worth $33.57 Billion Per Year

A peer-reviewed study commissioned by NOAA shows the American people assign an estimated total economic value of $33.57 billion for the coral reefs of the main Hawaiian Islands.

How Plants Sense Touch Gravity and Other Physical Forces

At the bottom of plants' ability to sense touch, gravity or a nearby trellis are mechanosensitive channels, pores through the cells' plasma membrane that are opened and closed by the deformation of the membrane.

Protein Reveals Oxygen Availability to Plants

Plants need water to grow, but every hobby gardener knows that you shouldn’t carry this to excess either. During waterlogging or flooding, plants can’t take up enough oxygen that they urgently need for their cellular respiration and energy production.

Poisonous Oceans Delayed Animal Evolution

Animals require oxygen, but oxygenated environments were rare on early Earth. New research from University of Southern Denmark shows that poisonous sulfide existed in the oceans 750 million years ago making large areas of the seafloor inhospitable to animal life. Such ocean conditions may have prohibited the emergence of animals on early Earth.

Research Eyes Energy-Saving Fluoros

The global trend toward using fluorescent globes instead of incandescent ones as a strategy to beat climate change could be increasing eye disease, according to new research by scientists at The Australian National University.

Significant Ozone Hole Remains Over Antarctica

The Antarctic ozone hole, which yawns wide every Southern Hemisphere spring, reached its annual peak on Sept. 12, stretching 10.05 million square miles, the ninth largest on record.



1,500 Toxic Drums and Containers Removed from Abandoned Warehouse in Puerto Rico

Removing a significant threat to public health and safety, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the municipality of Guaynabo, Puerto Rico, are proceeding with an emergency cleanup of improperly stored hazardous materials at a storage facility in Barrio Vietnam, Guaynabo.

Manuka Oil Shows Promise as a More Effective but Natural Weed Deterrent

Weeds have a greater impact on crop yields than any other pests. Over the past several decades, farmers have continually turned to synthetic herbicides because they are the most effective deterrent against weeds.

EPA Awards $50 Million for Clean Diesel Projects

Reducing diesel emissions helps decrease asthma attacks and premature deaths.

New Approach to Solar Power with Hybrid Solar-Thermoelectric Systems

Systems to harness the sun's energy typically generate either electricity or heat in the form of steam or hot water. But a new analysis by researchers at MIT shows that there could be significant advantages to systems that produce both electricity and heat simultaneously.

NOAA Releases Status on Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary Marine Resources

NOAA scientists have found that pressure from increasing coastal populations, ship and boat groundings, marine debris, poaching, and climate change are critically threatening the health of the Florida Keys ecosystem. Many historically abundant marine resources such as green sea turtles and coral habitat continue to be at risk with low rates of recovery.

Study Links Pollutants to a 450 Percent Increase in Risk of Birth Defects

Pesticides and pollutants are related to an alarming 450 percent increase in the risk of spina bifida and anencephaly in rural China, according to scientists at The University of Texas at Austin and Peking University.

U.S. EPA Delegates Clean Water Act Authority to Northern California Tribe

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently announced that Dry Creek Rancheria in Sonoma County, Calif., has gained authority to administer its own water quality programs under the federal Clean Water Act.

Should Corporate Crime Pay Punitive Damages Based on Company's Worth?

If courts were able to award appropriate punitive damages that punish wrongdoers at a level tied to a company's financial worth, then businesses big and small would be at risk of being put out of business by punitive damages, thus deterring unconscionable offenses and bad behavior in the first place.

Wildlife Conservation Society Uncovers Record Number of Jaguars in Bolivia

In a new camera trap survey in the world’s most biologically diverse landscape, researchers for the Wildlife Conservation Society have identified more individual jaguars than ever before.

Leaf Litter Ants Advance Case for Rainforest Conservation in Borneo

Studies of ant populations in Borneo reveal an unexpected resilience to areas of rainforest degraded by repeated intensive logging, a finding which conservationists hope will lead governments to conserve these areas rather than allow them to be cleared and used for cash crop plantations.

Green Roofs Save Money, Energy but Challenge Texas Plants

When contractors talk of green buildings, they mean environmentally-friendly and energy saving. Add agricultural experts in the plans, and “green” also means plants – vibrant ornamental grasses, shrubs and flowers in park-like settings on the roofs of multistoried office buildings in cities.

No More Buying Cars but Sharing Them?

Lower emissions, less noise, more quality of life – all good reasons to turn to electricity where mobility is concerned. If the EU has its way, we will all be driving only electric cars in the major cities of Europe by the year 2050. A beautiful goal, but experts are going even further than that: citizens can forego a car of their own and share electric vehicles.

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