Environmental Protection

Features


Measuring Water Quality Is Not an Easy Task

The job of cleaning up the nation’s waterways is a dirty one. And, apparently, one that is going to take much longer than Congress thought 35 years ago this month.

This article originally appeared in the 10/01/2007 issue of Environmental Protection.

Maximizing Your Monitoring Power

As water and wastewater facilities prepare for pending U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) criteria on water nutrient levels, online monitoring systems are proving to be an effective and efficient means of regulating the parameters.

This article originally appeared in the 10/01/2007 issue of Environmental Protection.

The Last Word

For decades, granular activated carbon (GAC) has been recognized as an effective technology for removing organic chemicals in a variety of environmental applications. With strong demand for virgin activated carbon in both process and environmental applications, the use of carbon reactivation and recycling has become an increasingly important option for many companies that currently rely on activated carbon for their treatment needs.

This article originally appeared in the 10/01/2007 issue of Environmental Protection.

Got Milkweed?

Mexican conservation policy to protect butterflies from illegal logging

This article originally appeared in the 10/01/2007 issue of Environmental Protection.

Navigating a Smart User Strategy

Geographic information system (GIS) software represents less than 10 percent of the total GIS implementation cost in most cases, yet many people spend a lot of time selecting the best software for their GIS applications. This is actually a good thing, because the success of any GIS program largely depends on its users—who are not happy if they do not like their GIS software.

This article originally appeared in the 10/01/2007 issue of Environmental Protection.

A New Standard for Rescue Systems

The American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) defines a confined space as an area that has limited openings for entry and exit, has poor natural ventilation that can pose serious risks, and is not designed for continuous occupancy by workers.

This article originally appeared in the 10/01/2007 issue of Environmental Protection.

Science Reconsiders the Value of Land Application

The Guidelines for Application of Sewage Biosolids to Agricultural Lands in the Northeastern U. S.offers the best science available and seeks to protect the land resource base, emphasizing agricultural productivity in perpetuity. Scientists from Cornell, Rutgers, the University of Massachusetts, Penn State, and the University of New Hampshire developed the document, which is an updated version of a 1985 document, Criteria and Recommendations for Land Application of Sewage Sludge in the Northeast.

This article originally appeared in the 10/01/2007 issue of Environmental Protection.

35 Years and Counting

October 18 is a special day for America’s waters, wetlands, and watersheds: the Clean Water Act (CWA) turns 35. As one of the world’s most successful and enduring environmental laws marks this milestone, it’s a great time to reflect on where we’ve been, what we’ve done, and where we need to go.

This article originally appeared in the 10/01/2007 issue of Environmental Protection.



California Love

WEFTEC celebrates its 80th in San Diego

This article originally appeared in the 10/01/2007 issue of Environmental Protection.

The Public's Health Gets Taken to the Cleaners

Seeking a new approach to deal with groundwater pollution caused by dry-cleaning chemicals

This article originally appeared in the 10/01/2007 issue of Environmental Protection.

Survival of the Fittest

Despite the common goal of environmental protection, federal agencies lately stand divided over the best use of our natural resources – to protect wildlife habitats or to expand water resource development for the future. More and more, these issues are splintering the industry into two camps supportive of either the Clean Water Act or the Endangered Species Act.

This article originally appeared in the 10/01/2007 issue of Environmental Protection.

Don't Let Your Energy Go Up In Smoke

Competitive pressures and unpredictable energy costs continuously motivate us to examine our processes for opportunities to increase quality and productivity, and to decrease costs. Energy-intensive processes such as those associated with the manufacture of a wide variety of products utilizing water or VOC-based solvents offer opportunities to reduce operating costs through heat management or control.

This article originally appeared in the 09/01/2007 issue of Environmental Protection.

Is Your Stormwater System a Washout?

Throughout the world, thousands of stormwater pollutant removal systems are being installed in an effort to prevent watercourses from being polluted. As supply has risen to meet demand, a variety of proprietary, chamber-based systems have emerged, including hydrodynamic separators, which are designed to settle out and store sediments and associated pollutants, preventing them from being discharged to the natural environment.

This article originally appeared in the 09/01/2007 issue of Environmental Protection.

Conquering Core Challenges

With great pride, we present the five winners of our annual Facilities of the Year Competition. These facilities represent a wide variety of industrial sectors and geographical locations.

This article originally appeared in the 09/01/2007 issue of Environmental Protection.

Cultivating a Greener Bottom Line

Radical change is coming to the business world. In the 21st century, many corporations are not just thinking about their bottom line, they also are thinking about their influences on the Earth. Public relations and marketing campaigns often focus on how companies are at the forefront of social responsibility.

This article originally appeared in the 09/01/2007 issue of Environmental Protection.

Want to Delay? You'll Pay

This article originally appeared in the 09/01/2007 issue of Environmental Protection.

The Particulars on Particulates

Last September, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) revised the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for particle pollution. As part of that measure, EPA issued revisions to the ambient air monitoring rules for fine particulate matter (PM-2.5). These actions were published in the Federal Register Oct. 17, 2006, and became effective Dec. 18, 2006.

This article originally appeared in the 09/01/2007 issue of Environmental Protection.

Nutrient Discharge Rules Make Reuse Attractive

Two cities that have been reusing water for more than five years are expanding their programs to serve additional customers and meet new nutrient discharge restrictions, exemplifying a national trend toward water reclamation.

This article originally appeared in the 08/01/2007 issue of Environmental Protection.

Knowing the Business

A little more than one year after launching its Water Wastewater Competency Center, Schneider Electric’s North American division’s orders are up more than 50 percent.

This article originally appeared in the 08/01/2007 issue of Environmental Protection.

Communal Enterprise

Situated in one of the world’s most arid regions, Israel has been overcoming water shortages and desertification since its inception in 1948. Its diverse topography, which includes plains, mountains, deserts, and coastlines, makes for many water challenges. A small country at 8,019 square miles (about the size of New Jersey), Israel sustains a population of 6.35 million people.

This article originally appeared in the 08/01/2007 issue of Environmental Protection.

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