Environmental Protection

Features


New Dimensions in Design

Facility designers traditionally have used two-dimensional (2-D) drawings to illustrate plans, sections, and associated information to their clients. This format requires reviewers to have strong visualization skills. It often lacks sufficient detail in the early stages, giving reviewers little to comment on until the drawings are nearly complete. By that time, changes are costly and time-consuming.

This article originally appeared in the 12/01/2007 issue of Environmental Protection.

Evaporating the Water Mirage

The view of our planet from space masks a perplexing irony. With water covering 71 percent of the Earth’s surface, we would expect plenty of this life-sustaining resource to go around.

This article originally appeared in the 12/01/2007 issue of Environmental Protection.

Contractors Turn Strategy Into Reality

A Garland, Texas, interceptor project took five years to get to the street. Now the contractors are making capacity improvements a reality by installing 48-inch outside diameter (OD) pipe over about 18 months.

This article originally appeared in the 12/01/2007 issue of Environmental Protection.

Green Pathways to Greenbacks

This article originally appeared in the 11/01/2007 issue of Environmental Protection.

Teamwork Pays Off

With an innovative design that integrates a state-of-the-art biosolids drying facility with the heat from a combined-cycle cogeneration plant, Corona, Calif.’s Clearwater Wastewater Treatment Plant No. 1 is helping to save energy.

This article originally appeared in the 11/01/2007 issue of Environmental Protection.

Surfing the Air Emissions Datawave

This article originally appeared in the 11/01/2007 issue of Environmental Protection.

Searching for Environmental Cleanup Liens Under EPA's New Rule

This article originally appeared in the 11/01/2007 issue of Environmental Protection.

The Business Outlook for the "Green" Economy

The business of protecting, improving, and providing information related to the global environment is growing. This emerging “green” economy has a solid base and the trends are very positive.

This article originally appeared in the 11/01/2007 issue of Environmental Protection.



Picking Up Speed

Nearly four decades ago, a dramatic deterioration of air quality and repeat occurrences of smog in large cities such as New York and Los Angeles led to national recognition of the growing problem of pollution from the automotive sector. As a result, Congress passed the Clean Air Act of 1970 – the first major environmental law intended to improve air quality by reducing emissions and pollutants from their sources.

This article originally appeared in the 11/01/2007 issue of Environmental Protection.

Cosmic Avenger

Interpretation of satellite imagery holds promise as the method to pinpoint early development of potentially toxic cyanobacterial blooms in water sources. The technology could help drinking water providers save money on treatment and avoid the pitfalls of dealing with this problem.

This article originally appeared in the 10/01/2007 issue of Environmental Protection.

Measuring Water Quality Is Not an Easy Task

The job of cleaning up the nation’s waterways is a dirty one. And, apparently, one that is going to take much longer than Congress thought 35 years ago this month.

This article originally appeared in the 10/01/2007 issue of Environmental Protection.

An Unwelcome Intruder

Vapor intrusion. If you haven’t yet heard the term, you soon will: A growing environmental concern that has made national headlines, this indoor air quality issue develops when rapidly evaporating chemicals from polluted soil or groundwater make their way to the indoor air of overlying buildings, similar to the way radon enters homes.

This article originally appeared in the 10/01/2007 issue of Environmental Protection.

Maximizing Your Monitoring Power

As water and wastewater facilities prepare for pending U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) criteria on water nutrient levels, online monitoring systems are proving to be an effective and efficient means of regulating the parameters.

This article originally appeared in the 10/01/2007 issue of Environmental Protection.

The Last Word

For decades, granular activated carbon (GAC) has been recognized as an effective technology for removing organic chemicals in a variety of environmental applications. With strong demand for virgin activated carbon in both process and environmental applications, the use of carbon reactivation and recycling has become an increasingly important option for many companies that currently rely on activated carbon for their treatment needs.

This article originally appeared in the 10/01/2007 issue of Environmental Protection.

Got Milkweed?

Mexican conservation policy to protect butterflies from illegal logging

This article originally appeared in the 10/01/2007 issue of Environmental Protection.

Navigating a Smart User Strategy

Geographic information system (GIS) software represents less than 10 percent of the total GIS implementation cost in most cases, yet many people spend a lot of time selecting the best software for their GIS applications. This is actually a good thing, because the success of any GIS program largely depends on its users—who are not happy if they do not like their GIS software.

This article originally appeared in the 10/01/2007 issue of Environmental Protection.

Science Reconsiders the Value of Land Application

The Guidelines for Application of Sewage Biosolids to Agricultural Lands in the Northeastern U. S.offers the best science available and seeks to protect the land resource base, emphasizing agricultural productivity in perpetuity. Scientists from Cornell, Rutgers, the University of Massachusetts, Penn State, and the University of New Hampshire developed the document, which is an updated version of a 1985 document, Criteria and Recommendations for Land Application of Sewage Sludge in the Northeast.

This article originally appeared in the 10/01/2007 issue of Environmental Protection.

A New Standard for Rescue Systems

The American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) defines a confined space as an area that has limited openings for entry and exit, has poor natural ventilation that can pose serious risks, and is not designed for continuous occupancy by workers.

This article originally appeared in the 10/01/2007 issue of Environmental Protection.

Survival of the Fittest

Despite the common goal of environmental protection, federal agencies lately stand divided over the best use of our natural resources – to protect wildlife habitats or to expand water resource development for the future. More and more, these issues are splintering the industry into two camps supportive of either the Clean Water Act or the Endangered Species Act.

This article originally appeared in the 10/01/2007 issue of Environmental Protection.

California Love

WEFTEC celebrates its 80th in San Diego

This article originally appeared in the 10/01/2007 issue of Environmental Protection.

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