Environmental Protection

Features


Deep-bed Detox

As total maximum daily loads (TMDLs) for nutrient discharges have been developed and further revised by federal and state agencies over the years to address water quality concerns, deep-bed denitrification filters have proven to be a highly effective treatment technology used by wastewater plants to meet low total nitrogen (TN) limits. Patented in 1979, the technology of combining denitrification and solids removal in a deep-bed filter process has helped to dramatically improve wastewater quality at treatment plants across the country.

This article originally appeared in the 09/01/2006 issue of Environmental Protection.

Probing for Better Data

Switching from a membrane-type dissolved oxygen (DO) probe to new, breakthrough luminescent technology has brought tighter control to the conventional aeration system serving the Holland Area Wastewater Treatment Plant. Plus, a four-month trial demonstrated that the new luminescent DO (LDO) probe performs well monitoring high-DO effluent from the facility's pure oxygen system. Until now, it had been difficult for the plant to find a reliable online measurement instrument for this environment.

This article originally appeared in the 09/01/2006 issue of Environmental Protection.

Nowhere to Hide

As populations and communities continue to grow and expand, the need to treat wastewater means more facilities near homes. So, out of sight, out of mind doesn't work anymore. Years ago, wastewater treatment plants were located far away from communities, and odor was only a problem for those at the facility. Now, with new home developments booming and urban growth extending into even the most remote areas, it has become an issue in all communities.

This article originally appeared in the 07/01/2006 issue of Environmental Protection.

A Change for the Better

Management at drinking water treatment facilities looking for an alternative to gaseous chlorine (Cl2) or sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) should seriously consider dry chlorine in the form of calcium hypochlorite briquettes. Drinking water treatment facilities switching from sodium hypochlorite to calcium hypochlorite for disinfection are finding this alternative to be an efficient solution for ensuring consistently accurate chlorination while eliminating many long-standing operations, maintenance, and safety concerns associated with NaOCl use.

This article originally appeared in the 07/01/2006 issue of Environmental Protection.

Blight to Bright

Insurance companies are helping turn contaminated sites turn into solar energy producers

This article originally appeared in the 07/01/2006 issue of Environmental Protection.

Hitting the Gas

It is well understood that the world's fossil fuel supplies have a finite lifetime --particularly oil. Forward-thinking scientists, political leaders, and other individuals have given thought for years to the transition in energy production that will inevitably be forced upon us as fossil fuel supplies dwindle.

This article originally appeared in the 07/01/2006 issue of Environmental Protection.

Conference Change

Conferences are a good leading indicator of emerging environmental trends. The meetings themselves may be planned a year or more in advance, but speakers generally talk about what is going on in "real-time" terms. Even more revealing are the informal networking discussions during the breaks when attendees share their hopes, fears, and ambitions. Indeed, tuning in to the buzz at these conferences is sometimes the best reason for attending. What's the buzz about today?

This article originally appeared in the 07/01/2006 issue of Environmental Protection.

A Membrane for All Seasons

Flexible design allows membrane treatment systems to fit almost any wastewater application

This article originally appeared in the 07/01/2006 issue of Environmental Protection.



For a Rainy Day

So you've completed your stormwater pollution prevention plan (SWP3) and filed your notice of intent (NOI). You're finished, right? Did you forget about the little part on the NOI that says you have developed and implemented your SWP3 prior to submitting the NOI? You still have to implement those Best Management Practices (BMPs) and other required elements of your permit. After all, lack of SWP3 implementation and good recordkeeping may result in a notice of violation (NOV), which in turn may lead an inspector to take a closer look at your facility. This is like inviting the inspector to view the skeletons in your closet. Don't give them an excuse to keep coming back.

This article originally appeared in the 07/01/2006 issue of Environmental Protection.

From the Editors

The Rising Tide of Stormwater Utilities

This article originally appeared in the 07/01/2006 issue of Environmental Protection.

What Kind of EHS Leader Are You?

The vast majority of environmental, health, and safety (EHS) professionals are competent, dedicated soldiers who fight the day-to-day battles to protect the health and safety of fellow employees, the community, and the environment.

This article originally appeared in the 06/01/2006 issue of Environmental Protection.

Perspective, Population, and Pollution

People are closed-minded. When it comes to ideas that oppose their own, most people will defend their position rather than give some serious consideration to an alternative viewpoint.

This article originally appeared in the 06/01/2006 issue of Environmental Protection.

A Shock to the System

On Jan. 23, 2006, the arsenic rule was implemented with a new limit of 10 parts per billion (ppb) (the old standard was 50 ppb). The new rule has a broad reach; it affects large and small drinking water treatment systems, including non-community water supplies.

This article originally appeared in the 06/01/2006 issue of Environmental Protection.

A Sure Thing

Some successful insurers prosper not because of anything they do internally, but because the people, businesses, or other organizations they insure behave in a way that leaves claims personnel twiddling their thumbs more often than not.

This article originally appeared in the 06/01/2006 issue of Environmental Protection.

Trailblazers

There is a rising flood of coverage in America of global climate change and greenhouse gases (GHGs), including a motion picture (The Day After Tomorrow), an HBO feature (Too Hot Not to Handle), a New York Times piece (Yelling 'Fire' on a Hot Planet), a TIME magazine cover story (Be Worried. Be Very Worried), a film starring Al Gore (An Inconvenient Truth), photos of receding glaciers, and reports of drowning polar bears.

This article originally appeared in the 06/01/2006 issue of Environmental Protection.

Oxidants on the Job

The need for removal and destruction of contaminants of concern (COC), like petroleum hydrocarbons and chlorinated organics, in soil and groundwater has led to the development of a wide range of technologies for both in ground (in-situ) and above ground (ex-situ) treatment of these contaminants.

This article originally appeared in the 06/01/2006 issue of Environmental Protection.

Lead Out

When the McDonald's Corporation formed an alliance with the non-profit Environmental Defense Fund in 1990 it was an extraordinary and newsworthy event. Business and environmentalists had been pitted against each other in conflicting values, policies, and public debate.

This article originally appeared in the 05/01/2006 issue of Environmental Protection.

It Rains, But It Might Not Pour

In wet weather monitoring, the collection system manager steps up, metaphorically, to spin the big wheel of weather chance. Too often they will experience the agony of a wet weather flow study budget wasted when there isn't enough rain during the period that the monitors are installed.

This article originally appeared in the 05/01/2006 issue of Environmental Protection.

From the Editors

Caught in a Flood

This article originally appeared in the 05/01/2006 issue of Environmental Protection.

What's Up Dock?

Near-shore construction projects can take forever. Design, environmental studies, permitting, building, and unforeseen circumstances, create a labyrinth worthy of any Minotaur.

This article originally appeared in the 05/01/2006 issue of Environmental Protection.

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